r/funny PortugueseGeese Comics Nov 04 '21 Silver 3

Super strength Verified

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7.7k Upvotes

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395

u/SwingingSalmon Nov 04 '21

I’ve always equated super strength to mean everything is super strong in your body, your skin, your bones, your muscles, etc.

78

u/Fyrefawx Nov 04 '21

There are so many downsides to super powers if they were real.

If you could fly you risk losing consciousness due to a lack of oxygen. That or one random bird could destroy you at high speeds.

Invisibility would suck. If you needed medical attention they could find you. You run the risk of being hit by cars, birds, or anyone that can’t see you really.

92

u/Killboypowerhed Nov 04 '21

If your invisibility is because light passes through you then it would also pass through your eyes and you'd be blind

40

u/LeGama Nov 04 '21

There's a character like this in an anime (My Hero Academia) called Lemillion. His power is to become completely intangible, and he actually describes it like that. When he turns intangible everything goes black because even light passes through him, and he loses basically all senses. So he has to pay super close attention to his surroundings before activation.

44

u/IDKyMyUsernameWontFi Nov 04 '21

He also talks about the nuance of the power that no one considers, like just walking through a wall is super complicated. He needs to phase just his front leg through, then active his body but not his back leg otherwise he’d fall into the ground. He starts to step through but then needs to solidify is front leg to stand on the other side of the wall, and activate his back leg to bring it through.

The whole moral of his character is that everyone meets this dude when he’s already perfected his power, after years and years of practice and they go “wow his quirk is super strong, he’s so lucky” when in reality it’s not that great on its own and it’s his hard work that makes him a phenomenal hero.

15

u/Justank Nov 05 '21

Lemillion's final stand against Overhaul does such a great job of exemplifying his character, it's an incredibly well done sequence. The punch immediately after losing his quirk, the absolute resilience to keep fighting as long as possible, knowing he just has to hold out. It would be unfortunate that it gets overshadowed by the following sequence if that following sequence wasn't so damn good. Eri's leap to Deku with Might+U playing is one of my all time favorite scenes in any media, and as a kid that grew up watching Dragonball Z, Deku vs. Overhaul was on par with Gohan vs. Cell for me.

5

u/bingojed Nov 05 '21

Be easiest to just jump through. Look at wall, run, jump, become intangible, go through wall, become normal, land.

6

u/IDKyMyUsernameWontFi Nov 05 '21

That’s true, but then you’re fully committed to going through. In a combat situation, he might be halfway through and then want to turn around and bail, which he can do if he still has one leg tangible to change his momentum.

Depends on the situation I guess.

1

u/Requad Nov 05 '21

Only if your inertia transfered while being intangible.

1

u/pebblypirate Nov 05 '21

The thing is that because when you're intangible you can't see, so if you jump you have to completely guess the thickness of the wall plus the height of the floor on the other side plus a bunch of other factors.

39

u/SuckerForGwent Nov 04 '21

Passes through everything except your eyes so that all anyone sees is a pair of eyes floating around

39

u/trust_me_on_that_one Nov 04 '21

👁️ 👁️

12

u/DarkestPassenger Nov 04 '21

I had never considered that part of it. Damn. Makes sense

2

u/MasonP2002 Nov 04 '21

Henry Stickmin got it right.

10

u/Sawses Nov 04 '21

The Wildcards books (edited by George R.R. Martin) do this a lot. The premise is that aliens release a virus that kills 90% of people who get it, mutates 9% into deformed monstrosities, and turns 1% into superheroes...whose powers often have a more realistic logic to them.

2

u/exsea Nov 05 '21

superspeed = your body mass cant sustain as you propel yourself forward at incredible speeds, disintegrating. if you had a suit like the flash, it could help but then...

also, if superspeed is not paired with super speed thinking/senses, you can't change your action. everything has to be decided in a splitsecond. something like planning a grand heist then let it play out. that bullet that you "planned" to catch? if you missed it, too bad, you have to let the plan play out. its likely you wouldnt even have time to process that you missed catching the bullet.

and if you had super speed thinking/senses. it might be a curse, IF you cant "turn it on and off at will". if you cant turn it off, you might end up killing yourself as the entire world moves so slowly. conversations are a drag. if your superspeed allows you to do things 8 times the speed of a regular person. now imagine a person telling you "Hello, good morning" which normally takes 1 second is now 8 seconds. for you to communicate with others, you need to purposely drag your speech else no one understands what it is you have to say, also people will view you as extremely fidgety.

it is also unknown if you age faster.

also, if we're talking about real downsides, you need to be able to access energy fast. if a normal human eats 3 times a day, does that mean at 8x speed you need to eat 24 times a day? also thats a very lazy calculation. if we take a car for an example, in order to move faster, we need to burn more "oil per second". the faster we want to push, the more oil we consume. also goes to the matter of do we also have "superspeed digestion". if our body cant digest food fast enough, we simply burn up more energy than we can use. unless of course you have a highly specialized "liquid food" that can easily boost your energy in a fast manner. else instead of being a speedster, you would have to purposefully minimize movement in order to not overspend energy which kinda negates superspeed to begin with.

2

u/portezbie Nov 05 '21

I remember a flash story where we learn his nightmare is to never be able to slow down and the be trapped alone in a world of statues.

1

u/GlassWasteland Nov 05 '21

Cataracts, the number one reason speedsters retire.

1

u/theWildBananas Nov 05 '21

Reminds me of a a sci fi story where timespace continuum was messed up and people started living at different timeframes, for some time passed slower, for some faster.

1

u/portezbie Nov 05 '21

I've always loved the idea of super speed, but it makes so little sense practically speaking. I mean look at race cars. They only go a few hundred miles per hour and can't make it through a single race without pit stops. The friction, the impact on your joints, being able to breath..

1

u/eikons Nov 05 '21

I mean, why would you fly at >5000 ft though? You wouldn't exactly be worried about fuel efficiency from drag if flying is your superpower...

1

u/-The-Oracle- Nov 05 '21

You might be interested in the superhero scientist. He has written a couple of books about the science behind the superpowers of the most popular superheroes

108

u/metathesis Nov 04 '21

Sometimes it just means glass cannon. But those times are usually a little weird about how much force the person can take while lifting vs while being hit with things.

8

u/fakertotal Nov 04 '21

Deku has entered the chat.

27

u/uh_der Nov 04 '21

yea ive always thought the same way as u/swingingsalmon. but u/metathesis coming with a glass cannon, id never heard that before but such a great analogy!

40

u/AAA1374 Nov 04 '21

Glass cannon is a common term for anything that is ridiculously powerful but very vulnerable or fragile. In sports in means players who get injured frequently but are very good- in gaming it usually means maxing out strength or damage but leaving defense or health at a minimum. Very lovely and image rich metaphor.

11

u/l337hackzor Nov 04 '21

Widely used in video games, most commonly to describe mages or Archer type characters. They have high damage but are fragile (cloth/leather armor).

Glass Canon is the name of an Talent for the sorcerer in Diablo 3 - "Increase all damage done by 15%, but decrease Armor and resistances by 10%."

7

u/AAA1374 Nov 04 '21

I usually build along these lines, I'm a big fan of DPS roles

3

u/BigUptokes Nov 04 '21

Monkey brain like big numbers.

1

u/Justank Nov 05 '21

Zug zug. SMASH.

2

u/jlharper Nov 04 '21

Glass canon has been the term for that kind of character since before videogames were much of a thing because of tabletop RPGs. A lot of videogame terminology is actually DnD terminology.

9

u/br0b1wan Nov 04 '21

The term has been used in sports for several decades now. It usually means a supremely talented, otherwise unstoppable player who keeps getting injured.

24

u/dougiefresh22 Nov 04 '21

I'm not a sports ball guy, but glass cannon is also often used in video games where the character can do a lot of damage, but can't take it. A game I've been playing has an armor piece with an ability called Glass Cannon which dramatically ups your damage to enemies while equally upping the damage taken.

11

u/Phipple Nov 04 '21

Enter The Gungeon has a gun called Glass Cannon that deals a shit ton of damage, but if you get hit while you have it out, the gun breaks.

2

u/Sweetwill62 Nov 04 '21

Is it Risk of Rain 2?

3

u/dougiefresh22 Nov 04 '21

The Division 2

1

u/Sweetwill62 Nov 05 '21

Not surprised it is in more than one game.

2

u/uh_der Nov 04 '21

its just great. I hope I remember it when I have the chance to put it out there. ill probably forget though.

2

u/Disco_Ninjas Nov 04 '21

It originated with MMO's. High DPS builds with no defense.

1

u/Earthguy69 Nov 04 '21

You try lifting a car. You tare every muscle and get several compressions in your spine. It takes months of physical therapy to get back to anything remotely functional and you suffer from chronic, debilitating pain.

12

u/Hubris2 Nov 04 '21

In reality any super power essentially needs to be more than one. Super speed would require durability or rejuvenation, along with super strength.

2

u/striker180 Nov 04 '21

And heat/friction resistance

1

u/ExplodingPotato_ Nov 05 '21

Only if you're getting into transsonic/supersonic speeds.

You could probably get away with 200-300 km/h with good clothes and shoes with reinforced soles.

1

u/YojiH2O Nov 05 '21

So what about telekinesis or matter manipulation type powers. Or conjuring like Roy mustangs fire of FMA, minus the alchemic symbol gloves?

1

u/Hubris2 Nov 05 '21

Good point - some of the mental powers may not require much for physical reinforcement - Professor X is certainly an example of that.

1

u/YojiH2O Nov 05 '21

Yeah but when he has a bad day….. oh boy oh boy

7

u/ArchDucky Nov 04 '21

Thats why Hulk can jump like a motherfucker. Because his legs are hulk strong and traditionally your legs can lift a lot more than your arms can.

3

u/AceofMandos Nov 04 '21

Strength is basically just durability and motor function

1

u/whyareyouaskingmeme Nov 04 '21

Super durability

1

u/CamelSpotting Nov 04 '21

If you didn't have that you wouldn't even make it to hitting the tree, you'd destroy your ligaments and bones before you got to the end of your punch.

277

u/pipboy_warrior Nov 04 '21

Midoriya's whole dilemma with One-For-All in a nutshell.

87

u/SFWxMadHatter Nov 04 '21

One of my favorite things about that show is how they handle the downsides to a lot of abilities no one really considers when playing the "I wish" game.

46

u/GamerGypps Nov 04 '21

One of my favorite things about that show is how they handle the downsides to a lot of abilities

And then completely forget about them for the next 3 seasons. It was literally only relevant for the tournemant arc. Not to mention one of the characters literally has zero downsides anyway if he uses all of his quirk.

42

u/SFWxMadHatter Nov 04 '21

I don't think it's so much that they forgot as it is they just trained out of them. Deku was just a normal kid even after all of his training, so his body was unaccustomed to such raw power. Continued use and training after inheritance lead to a more "super" body and his own flesh became one with the abilities. You can still see it with things like Mirio becoming intangible and falling through the ground, unable to breathe or see. Or Shigaraki's flash back with his own decay work deteriorating his own skin when he was young while it doesn't seem to bother him as much in current times.

30

u/Mattdriver12 Nov 04 '21

Exactly. This was the whole point of the hero training arc in the woods where they would just spam their abilities to train them, make them strong and make them more accustomed to the downsides.

4

u/Shleppy2010 Nov 04 '21

See this always had me wondering why they didn't train their quirks heavily before high school. Izawa basically says they weren't allowed to use their quirks at school until arriving at UA. Why not have them train from the time they get them to make sure they are fully integrated with their bodies?

26

u/Necoras Nov 04 '21

How many 6 year olds do you see running 10 miles every morning, or bench-pressing several times a week? They only start training hard once they're in a specialist program.

0

u/Shleppy2010 Nov 04 '21

I'm not really saying that they train like Olympic athletes from the day they are born. What I am saying is allow them to spam their quirks and develop them at school in a controlled environment to let their bodies become used to their quirks much earlier.

11

u/SpuukBoi Nov 04 '21

Because then you have children who don't know how to control their potentially dangerous abilities all in one place and somebody could get hurt. Better to let them get used to it first. Also the non-hero parents probably don't think it's worth it to pay someone to watch their kid while they practice using their quirk.

5

u/secretdrug Nov 04 '21

yep. we've already seen what happens when children with powerful abilities can't control them (eri and shigaraki). The thing is not all abilities are quite as powerful as theirs. some are more linear in scaling like someone with a fire quirk or strength quirk and requires training to be strong. Imagine an 8 yr old gets upset and has a strong quirk because they'd been training it since they were 5. well now you have a burnt down block or a collapsed building or dead children on a playground. If they're prevented from training their abilities until they're older and more cognizant then you prevent a lot of these incidents because their quirks are too weak to cause that scale of destruction.

also, I imagine it prevents a lot of mental issues. like imagine a 5 yr old learning they can get what they want because they have a strong quirk and can use it to threaten weaker adults to get what they want. Thats like easily a villain origin story. Sure, not all kids would be like this but I'm sure just blanket telling all children they can't use their quirks would prevent at least some of this type of thing from occuring.

→ More replies

2

u/Kellogg_Serial Nov 04 '21

Don't they explore the pressure and strain of that kind of intense training on younger children with Endeavor and his family though?

1

u/eddmario Nov 05 '21

What I am saying is allow them to spam their quirks and develop them at school in a controlled environment to let their bodies become used to their quirks much earlier.

That's literally the whole reason UA exists though.

Hell, quirks still develop over time after they've already manifested and aren't fully developed until around high school age.

1

u/Klepto666 Nov 05 '21

Yeah but the point being made is that UA has a rigorous initiation test to weed out people who can't handle their quirks (and either not getting enough points or not showcasing hero material to make up for that).

Except people aren't supposed to be using their quirks constantly because of the potential dangers. And yet then they're suddenly supposed to use them and know how to use them effectively in order to get into UA.

It's like wanting to join a swimming class so you can be a good swimmer, but they make everyone do races and laps in the water in order to select only the best swimmers, when the world actively discourages you from spending time in large bodies of water so you aren't even a halfway-decent swimmer.

The super powerful initiates that showed off at the beginning of the UA exam? They got private training already, or disregarded societal rules and used their quirks constantly in private, which could have been really dangerous depending on what the quirk is.

1

u/striker180 Nov 04 '21

Thats another problem though, how the hell did all of them pass the entrance test if they weren't allowed to practice with their quarks before hand?

1

u/SFWxMadHatter Nov 05 '21

They can't use them while in school but that doesn't stop them from receiving private training at home, look at Endeavor, or just using them to "play" and becoming for adjusted to them that way.

1

u/striker180 Nov 05 '21

Thats a fair point

7

u/bigmac1122 Nov 04 '21

I imagine your standard school teacher isnt equipped to handle the situation if something was to get out of control. At least at UA they are in a controlled environment with professionals specifically trained to handle this sort of thing.

1

u/Shleppy2010 Nov 04 '21

I get that, but having a quirk class in middle school that is run similar to how the hero course works would only need 1 or 2 hero trained teachers.

2

u/Denamic Nov 04 '21

Because it's literally illegal

1

u/Shleppy2010 Nov 04 '21

I understand it's illegal, what I'm saying is why is it illegal? Give those growing up the ability and safe location to test and train their quirks. It would let them gain better control and set them up for higher success for those who go for quirk advantaged jobs.

1

u/Denamic Nov 04 '21

Because these are people with guns for hands. Sometimes even literally. In the real world, you can only fire guns at specific location or in specific circumstances, and even then only when licensed. It's a bad idea to make anyone, let alone kids, play around with that kind of power without specialized guidance and oversight.

1

u/Shleppy2010 Nov 04 '21

That's why I'm saying that they do it at earlier levels of school. Controlled environment where they can get accustomed to their quirks early on. While I get that UA has a huge amount of training centers and funding, it still wouldn't be hard to have a contained building or a open area where it would be safe to use their quirks.

1

u/Mattdriver12 Nov 04 '21

No one is allowed to use a quirk at all outside. Only the heroes are permitted to use their quirks.

1

u/Shleppy2010 Nov 04 '21

Midoria's mom quite literally uses her quirk to pick up a toy midoria drops in the doctors office. That law is more pointed at the use of quirks to break laws (villians) or vigilantes.

I understand quirk use is limited outside of heros, what I am saying is let the kids use their quirks at school to get used to them. Safe training environment and gets them used to their quirks much more early. I mean look at how far both hero classes got in a year, if they had 3 more in middle school they would have had a much higher bar to start from.

2

u/mooseknuckle09 Nov 04 '21

I’ve been following the manga since it started and it was absolutely amazing. The anime too. But the manga is in its final arc and it’s just gotten so mediocre lately. Like I can’t find myself excited for any of it. Which is a super bummer for me.

6

u/tobi310500 Nov 04 '21

Damn really? So far these past few arcs have been some of the most exciting. I guess deku getting strong enough to be on par with the top heroes felt a bit rushed but other than that I'm really enjoying it.

2

u/Guy_Striker Nov 04 '21

Interestingly i've been enjoying the manga (especially the current fight) but the last 2 seasons of the Anime have been such a disapointment. The show used to have such amazing animation but now it seems all that work is put into the movies instead. While the Anime got turned into a slideshow.

2

u/mooseknuckle09 Nov 04 '21

Are you fully caught up on the manga? If not, spoilers below.

I loved everything up to the Hero Liberation Arc. But this aftermath arc has been its weakest so far. Midoriya suddenly has perfect control of everything and he’s so overpowered it’s kinda boring. Plus the One For All taking over Shigaraki is a disappointment(I liked Shigaraki)

1

u/Guy_Striker Nov 04 '21

I am indeed fully caught up. Shigaraki is definitely still shigaraki. Or at least Shigaraki +. also the threats have escalated to a point where Midoriya's sudden growth doesn't bug me. I feel it's explained well enough by him finally being able to speak with the vestiges. Also the US Number 1 is insanely op.

1

u/xombz Nov 04 '21

They all have limits and through training, they learned what those limits are. People have already left their input though. So, what character are you taking about? Who do you think has no negative aspect to their quirk? I had in mind Bakugo but he's learned from a young age that he can hurt himself.

1

u/Sabandijor Nov 05 '21

I am to date with the manga and he can still break his limbs if he goes too far.

Not sure on how it is handled in the anime.

3

u/rawwrrob Nov 04 '21

Attack on Titan had that too with Eren punching things so hard as a titan that his hands or arms essentially exploded. When he tried to punch the pinned female titan, his arm bones exploded out of his skin and muscles.

1

u/Illusive_Man Nov 05 '21

yeah but his arms just keep growing back. I don’t think it hurts him either.

5

u/Lore-Warden Nov 04 '21

Midoriya's, and everyone else's in the show for that matter, durability fluctuates so wildly that it actually drives me insane.

3

u/Guy_Striker Nov 04 '21

I find it's pretty consistent in the main show itself. But then you have the movies where Todoroki can get chokeslammed through concrete and come out nearly unscathed.

Clip for those curious: https://youtu.be/ghfOEAAwS\_8

4

u/Shadow_Hydra Nov 04 '21

Ah you beat me to it. Great job.

1

u/southdubify Nov 04 '21

Came here to say this

1

u/Deathcrush Nov 04 '21

At least it doesn't hurt his belly button.

19

u/neednintendo Nov 04 '21

This invokes the trope "Required Secondary Super Powers." Enjoy the read if you're not a fan of the site already!

50

u/regular_lamp Nov 04 '21

That always bothered me about the Jessica Jones show. It seems she has reason to be worried about guns and knives etc. but by that logic she should injure herself all the time applying her super strength?

11

u/DRoyLinker Nov 04 '21

in the netflix series, jessica jones does have enhanced durability
it's not nearly on the same level as luke cage's durability though

31

u/HouseCravenRaw Nov 04 '21

Any time I attempt to rationalize it, I imagine that in each of these instances the hero doesn't actually have super strength per se, they have a telekinetic field that they can very briefly form. It makes lifting a car by it's bumper make more sense. Or punching a villain and sending them flying, instead of just sending a fist-shaped piece of meat flying, or exploding their entire body. If Superman grabs the nose of an airplane and lowers it to the ground, it only makes sense if he is somehow holding the sides, the bottom, etc to distribute the weight over a large area. The nose of an airplane cannot take the weight of an airplane.

It would also explain why some of them are able to punch a bullet but can still get shot. The field only forms with direct intention. Unless you are bullet proof - then you've got an always-on field.

Then again, it's all make believe and thinking too hard about these things tends to end badly.

14

u/SadPenisMatinee Nov 04 '21

Irredeemable comic had that.

They explained that the Plutonian does not actually have superpowers but that his ability to basically warp reality around him causes it to appear that way.

He flies by making the atoms everywhere press against himself so he is like wet soap flying out of a hand.

His super durability is just his mind making shit, as it gets closer to his body, basically become weaker.

I really liked how they explained it. Also the comic is good but a little long

6

u/Guy_Striker Nov 04 '21

If i remember correctly this was actually a cannonical explanation for Superman's powers for awhile.

8

u/DarthDannyBoy Nov 04 '21 edited Nov 04 '21

It was the explanation as to why he can catch say an aircraft by the nose and it doesn't just crumple around him. Or any similar issues. So in short not HIS strength, but the magical structural integrity of the thing he is trying to save.

It's also used to explain the issue of center of gravity and weight etc. He is still that strong they just used the bio whatever field to explain away physics.

They were adamant that he is still super humanly strong as shown in the comics the field is just to fix physics.

3

u/EvidenceOfReason Nov 04 '21

same explanation for why his clothes never tear or get dirty, he unconsciously protects them with his mind powers

1

u/itanshi Nov 04 '21

Sounds almost like aura (rwby)

2

u/not-now-dammit Nov 04 '21

Force over area… falling down stairs is a lot more likely to cause broken bones due to the likelihood of heavy impact right on a corner than breaking bones due to lifting something heavy.

1

u/Levithan6785 Nov 05 '21

I like to think about it as properties that some materials have. Such as concrete having good compressive resistance, but weak to shear forces. Apply 10,000lbs of compression. No problem. Apply 1,000lbs of shear force, shit starts breaking. Same can be said for human body.

We already see it in our own bodies after all. Certain parts are able to handle different forces better.

11

u/Entaris Nov 04 '21

Super strength isn't all its cracked up to be anyway. Someone did the math once... The speed/strength at which superman can throw a punch would basically create a concussive force around him that would be the equivalent power of a nuke going off. A single punch would destroy the city he was trying to protect and kill everyone in it.

3

u/seanbrockest Nov 04 '21

http://imgur.com/gallery/UaC5QHR

Here's some math I put together for this scene. What I forgot to mention is that it would be literally impossible for him to hear the baseball approaching, since it's traveling insanely faster than the speed of sound.

Somebody in the comments of that image also did the math on how many tons of TNT force the baseball was hitting his glove with.

24

u/mklilley351 Nov 04 '21

My Hero Academia??

3

u/bilog78 Nov 04 '21

Everybody keeps talking about that, but my first thought was actually To Be Continued.

2

u/Lovat69 Nov 04 '21

Well that's charming.

6

u/azangru Nov 04 '21

Protien :-)

6

u/seanbrockest Nov 04 '21

Climax Scene from the animated "Ghost in the Shell" deals with this pretty well. She has the strength to try and rip apart a tank, but her internal body structure can't handle it. Her cybernetic muscles end up pulling her endoskeleton apart.

3

u/mpelton Nov 04 '21

Like Berserk

8

u/Logistic_wiseguy24 Nov 04 '21

it do make sense doe

10

u/Armpit_Penguin PortugueseGeese Comics Nov 04 '21

At least you can still lift stuff pretty well

6

u/noheroespdx Nov 04 '21

Would your bones break from the weight?

8

u/zsdonny Nov 04 '21

Maybe it is super muscle and normal bone so if you flex hard enough you can steel through weight that can break your bone

Sounds like an interesting quirk to explore

3

u/SolidSquid Nov 04 '21

From experience, the tendons would probably tear away from your bones (although *technically* that might be because of pieces of bones being pulled off)

3

u/OlyScott Nov 04 '21

That must have been a horrible experience.

2

u/SolidSquid Nov 04 '21

More frustrating, was in a cycling accident when someone cut across a junction in front of me in a car. Had to brake so hard I went over the handlebars, and although I managed to break my fall without any serious injury the muscle on my left arm managed to crack the sticky out bit on my elbow because of how much force it went through. If I'd been going any faster it would have been *much* worse, and probably required surgery to re-attach the tendon (crack was only half way through the piece of bone)

2

u/MonkeysOnMyBottom Nov 04 '21

Not the person you are responding to, but i had an ACL tear. It's not super fun

3

u/Raemnant Nov 04 '21

As a weight lifter, I know first hand that its the tendons you must first be warry of

1

u/Vinegar-Toucher Nov 05 '21

average bone can support a powerlifter's lifts.

Biggest risk would probably be snapping your own spine at some point, but that's mainly because the strength is superhuman.

1

u/regular_lamp Nov 04 '21

But even then, this is usually shown as super people grabbing on to the sides of heavy objects and somehow lifting them. If you had the strength to lift a car grabbing on to the side of it and applying force would result in you doing a cirque the soleil act on the car and not the car leaving the ground. You'd also need "super weight" to pull this off.

1

u/AveragelyUnique Nov 05 '21

I said it below but I think Superman could pull it off with his ability of flight. He could theoretically get around this problem by counteracting the force reactions of lifting a heavy solid object without being completely under the center of gravity.

1

u/pipboy_warrior Nov 04 '21

I don't think it would work that way. Imagine if Superman suddenly handed a car to a normal person. Not even threw or lightly tossed, just went "Here, hold this for me." No matter how strong that person, their body would be crushed by the weight unless they had some kind of indestructible physique to compensate.

6

u/on_ Nov 04 '21 edited Nov 04 '21

And even if you are though your weight matters. Superman can not lift a tank if he himself doesn’t weight tons. Center of gravity doesn’t care about your super strength or rugged skin and bones.

16

u/SFWxMadHatter Nov 04 '21

I mean, in the case of Supes he can fly, I don't think he gives a shit about gravity, either.

5

u/DarthDannyBoy Nov 04 '21

I don't think Superman cares about physics he can fly and shoot lasers from his eyes. Also they have explained why he can do shit that violates physics. He has a special bio whatever field, I. Short telekinesis of a type

1

u/wolfram42 Nov 04 '21

My favorite is when someone grabs a helicopter and stops it from taking off.

Sometimes it is done well and the hero or villain clearly has something that they are planting their feet in.

1

u/KypDurron Nov 05 '21

Like Cap stopping the helicopter in Winter Soldier.

Setting aside the force on Cap's body, that's one goddamn strong railing - the helicopter is pulling with thousands of pounds of force, in a direction that the railing isn't really designed for, and it doesn't budge.

1

u/AveragelyUnique Nov 05 '21

He could certainly lift it but yes he would have to lift one end and then get under the center of gravity in order to do so. And that is assuming that he doesn't immediately sink into the ground due to the small surface area of his feet carrying the weight of a tank, which he would.

Although the wild card would be his ability to fly thrown in there. I think it is possible that he exerts enough downforce with his ability to fly in order to lift the tank in the manner depicted in the comics. That could allow him to "weigh" more than the object he lifts but there's still the problem of the pressure exerted on the ground through his feet.

Or he could use his flight abilities to apply enough backwards and downwards force, essentially bracing himself with his flight to prevent him from moving, that he could counteract the moment caused by the distance from the COG of the tank. I may be somewhat off there but I think I'm onto something.

2

u/jva21 Nov 04 '21

You made me think, you shouldn't do that

2

u/allursnakes Nov 04 '21

Imagine the egg in the microwave.

2

u/Lovat69 Nov 04 '21

Deku, is that you?

2

u/GlassWasteland Nov 05 '21

If you are super strong, but not super tough you just invest in lots and lots of balls. Ball bearings, base balls, bowling balls, cannon balls, etc... just throw them at things. No punching needed.

2

u/RussianMafiaGod999 Nov 05 '21

Where’s the funny

3

u/deathbunny32 Nov 04 '21

If you ever see those super strong dudes doing something crazy like bend a frying pan or crush a can, they always use a towel so they don't shred their hands

2

u/big_bad_brownie Nov 04 '21

The object won’t return equivalent opposite force if you break through it. That’s why Muay Thai guys can break baseball bats with their shins.

1

u/HonorableTurtle Nov 04 '21

INVINCIBLE SPOILERS Reminds me when mark punched Allen's arm jokingly and his arm flew off from the impact

-1

u/handsanatiezer Nov 04 '21

Funny!!! 👍👍👍👍👍

1

u/musicman0359 Nov 04 '21

That last panel is Booger McFarland's hands.

1

u/pr0b0ner Nov 04 '21

Yes, this! Every once in a while there's a movie where someone gets a suit of some sort that allows them to be super strong and they start punching through walls, and I'm like wtf, they still have bare hands? I'm looking at you Matt Damon in Elysium!

1

u/QuietDrives87 Nov 04 '21

he would also tear nearly every muscle in his body when using his super strength

1

u/supercyberlurker Nov 04 '21

There's a scene in Baki The Grappler where a character has the 'mach punch' which is a punch faster than the speed of sound. Later he improves it even more, uses it.. and realizes he ruined his hand when he actually hit a person with it... of course this is Baki, where that same character's dad hurt -his- hands but was glad because then he could use a true 'spear hand technique' without worrying about his finger bones...

1

u/EvidenceOfReason Nov 04 '21

super strength would come from extremely dense muscles, and if you had extremely dense muscles, why wouldnt the rest of you be extremely dense as well (bones, skin, etc)

super strength would necessarily come with substantially increased resistance to damage, they are intertwined.

1

u/No1WillEverBelieveU Nov 04 '21

I consider this when people ask "Would you want the ability to fly?" I mean, yes, just for the "ability", but I don't think it'll be like when Superman flies., where you can go at jet speeds. I imagine for a normal person it'd be like "swimming" in the air. You can get tired fairly easily if you're not in cardio shape, and even if you are, you're not going a hundred miles an hour.

1

u/Neoxite23 Nov 04 '21

I thought the whole reason your hand hurting when you punch something hard was because of physics and the force is applied in equal measure if it is stopped or slowed...hence the pain.

But if you go through something without any loss of power or force...regardless if it is a building or not...then there is no force applied to your hand so you feel no pain.

I could be extremely wrong though...I'm hardly a physics or biology major.

1

u/Pencilman7 Nov 05 '21

This is true if the thing moves out of your way as you hit it (like a ball or a human skull) but if it's stationary then it's a contested check between the two materials. Try to break a brick with a Twinkie, same deal.

1

u/KypDurron Nov 05 '21

a contested check between the two materials

This sounds less like physics and more like a tabletop RPG

1

u/AveragelyUnique Nov 05 '21

Sir Isaac Newton would like a word... Short answer is no this would not be the case.

If one applies a force to an object sufficient to punch right through it, there is going to be an equal and opposite force applied to the object that you are punching with (hand in this case).

The only way this would work without destroying their hand would be that their body and hand is strong enough to take that force without being destroyed. To punch through a tank with an object (hand) without the object taking any damage would require an extremely dense material with crazy high yield and compressive strength (preventing any deformation). An example of this would be depleted uranium or tungsten projectiles used to destroy tanks but even those materials don't have the material strength required to avoid deformation.

Basically your hand (and body) would have to be indestructible or it would turn into a bloody pulp, probably in an explosive manner.

1

u/mongster2 Nov 04 '21

Or super pain resistance...

1

u/Fly_Pelican Nov 04 '21

That always bothered me about the six million dollar man. How could his spine stay in one piece while he's lifiting a car?

1

u/WillyM35 Nov 04 '21

The avengers... hawkeye and black widow should have died like 5000 times throughout the series.

2

u/ArchDucky Nov 04 '21

I still can't believe they both fought to kill themselves. It was such a strange scene.

1

u/danceswithdux Nov 04 '21

Dresden Files has an example of this. Failures of mages not understanding that just because you enhance your speed you don't enhance your muscles and joints to take the strength. Or having a higher basal rate of healing also ages you. Or the augmenting a human brain to get over fear or addiction can have consequences related to mood or function

1

u/thoggins Nov 04 '21

it's kind of funny because in the early books he explains these limitations as if they're common misconceptions about magic, but in later books he or other wizards/magical beings use magic that do these things and don't suffer these drawbacks. so it's really down to being good enough at magic that you actually account for all the things you need to.

1

u/KypDurron Nov 05 '21

Of course, the near-perfect cell copying that he experiences makes up for the incredible strain he puts his body under.

Physical therapists hate him! One weird trick to recover from spinal injuries!

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA or the White Council. Dresden Files is not responsible for loss of soul.

1

u/xxadmxx Nov 04 '21

Physically speaking this would be true. Your body would indeed break down if you threw that much force behind a punch without the necessary integrity to hold the body together.

1

u/Tallerthanatree Nov 04 '21

I’m not a writer, but I’ve always had this comic idea in my head similar to this where people with super powers actually have huge drawbacks (similar to mutants in the x men that think of their power as a curse). Like a super strength person without any defense, so he/she has great strength, but constantly is suffering from broken bones breaking under the pressure, or hands/feet breaking from punching kicking so hard, or someone that can control heat/cold but still suffers from burns or frostbite, or a telepath that feels pain from the same range he/she is telepathic, so even though he/she can crush a can next to her, he/she would feel the same pain, or something similar to the Thing from fantastic four that has strong defensive plates but shitty joints and looks like a freak.

1

u/Denamic Nov 04 '21

Basically the premise behind Midoriya Izuku from My Hero Academia.

1

u/1CEninja Nov 04 '21

This is one of the examples of why the magic in Dresden Files is my favorite. He makes comments of how he could give himself super strength but bones are just bones, and things that have super strength have minimal advantage unless they have leverage.

He brings up physics repeatedly and how mass and energy can't be created, only changed.

1

u/KypDurron Nov 05 '21

The number of times he makes use of the fact that even an incredibly strong creature is as vulnerable to physics as a weakling when they're jumping through the air... You'd think immortal beings from the Nevernever etc. would have learned that after a few centuries.

1

u/1CEninja Nov 05 '21

Immortal beings don't learn nearly as fast as humans. It's a tactic that probably worked fine for a very long time, as it is incredibly intimidating.

The average human's understanding of physics was more or less non-existent until the age of literacy.

Also IIRC the first time this is mentioned was with the loup garu, which isn't exactly using tactics or strategy to mail things to death.

1

u/Ic3yFr0ggy Nov 04 '21

This has so many flaws

1

u/WillBigly Nov 04 '21

Newtons 3rd law ladies & gents

1

u/ArcerPL Nov 04 '21

so if you slap somebody really hard, can they pierce through a wall or sth

1

u/AndrewsBR Nov 04 '21

Durability*

1

u/MOTAMOUTH Nov 04 '21

This would also happen with super speed. Only exception is Superman. Every other fast superhero would burn up from the wind friction.

1

u/Google_Overlord Nov 04 '21

Even regular invincibility would do

1

u/anyadseszeret69 Nov 04 '21

Deku be like

1

u/PigeonInAToaster Nov 04 '21

Muscle strength? Strong bones? Strong skin? doesn't supper strength cover all these things?

1

u/KypDurron Nov 05 '21

Nah, that's luncheon strength

1

u/knightopusdei Nov 04 '21

AKA .... cocaine

1

u/darkness15shp Nov 04 '21

The plot of my hero academia

1

u/iaido22 Nov 05 '21

A warrior of unfortunate proportion.

1

u/therealstupid Nov 05 '21

People talk about MHA but this is pretty much the main plot of Charlotte.

1

u/Remote-thing Nov 05 '21

its nothing its just a scratch tho hahaha.

1

u/nikstick22 Nov 05 '21

Flex too hard and break your own bones.

(this happened to someone once)

1

u/Interesting-Law-5880 Nov 05 '21

This also mean he could be wearing a very very very heavy and protective armor that could fix part of his vulnerability problem

1

u/pauljs75 Nov 05 '21

When the protagonist is a glass-cannon character.

1

u/KChilds_123 Nov 05 '21

Know your limitations. Lol

1

u/MaffinLP Nov 05 '21

Gloves that are soft on the inside metal plated on the outside? Youre super strong you can run around in an iron man suit without external energy

1

u/wolverine_shy Nov 05 '21

Just invisibility would suffice

1

u/Quiet_Cobbler_2195 Nov 05 '21

Use melee weapons