r/dataisbeautiful OC: 14 Oct 12 '21 Silver 5 Helpful 6 Wholesome 3 Hugz 3

[OC] Happy Indigenous Peoples' Day. Map of tribal land cessions to the U.S. government, 1784-1893. OC

13.1k Upvotes

u/dataisbeautiful-bot OC: ∞ Oct 13 '21

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1.9k

u/Kazmania21 Oct 13 '21

6 seconds for 109 years. I’m too dumb to understand it that quickly.

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u/gordo65 Oct 13 '21

It also would have been helpful to include a legend so that we'd know which tribes corresponded to which color. Also, I would have liked to see the changing US national boundary and the relocations.

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u/DrSquirrelBoy12 Oct 13 '21

I don't think the colors correspond to tribes, I think each color is a cession to the US government.

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u/theLiteral_Opposite Oct 13 '21

What does that mean: each color is a secession to the US government? That doesn’t make sense. Each color represents the same thing? So why are there different colors.

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u/slacktopuss Oct 13 '21

Each colored area represents an area described in a cession treaty (sometimes multiple treaties). Each treaty would be with one or more groups of natives claiming the area described. It was common for a treaty to involve several tribes, and for the same tribes to be involved in several treaties.

You can see details of the areas on this map.

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u/draculamilktoast Oct 13 '21

which tribes corresponded to which color

When you have your lebensraum you should probably not think about who you got it from lest you develop some of that nasty pesky guilt. /s

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u/enTerbury Oct 13 '21

control of land: native americans => USA

thats what happened.

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u/probablyuntrue Oct 13 '21

but they get uh....casinos, that balances it out right?

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u/breadman017 Oct 13 '21

And we'll name a truck after you

19

u/Bayoris Oct 13 '21

And some sports teams

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u/drDekaywood Oct 13 '21

And centuries after the colonizing of America name one team the incorrect origin for another 125 years

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u/RedstoneRusty Oct 13 '21

And a helicopter that we'll use to kill native peoples of other lands 😀👍

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u/ReptileElite Oct 13 '21

And a motorcycle like wtf

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u/mishaco Oct 13 '21

some did. others are classified as non federally recognized.

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u/BigBeagleEars Oct 13 '21

Oof. Having trouble looking at the glass half full on that one

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u/enTerbury Oct 13 '21

tbf most conquered people didnt even end up with a footnote in a single history book so theres that.

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u/Big-Gear7279 Oct 13 '21

They werent conquered america broke their treaties to appease people into giving free real estate, now you guys ran out and your country, which is just the biggest real estate ponzi i, has run out of land and every single societal structure that maintains the idea of "america" has gone to shit.

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u/ok_ill_shut_up Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

How lucky we are. My tribe has a casino. Why don't you look up our poverty rate.

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u/permanentlyclosed Oct 13 '21

At least you have a tribe. My people don’t even exist anymore

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u/1Eternallylost Oct 13 '21

I'm from Europe and my people don't exist anymore.

There are no Bohemians today.

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u/texasradioandthebigb Oct 13 '21

Oh come on. I love the word, "cession". Seems so peaceful, and voluntary somehow

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u/Aloonatron Oct 13 '21

They didn't have a flaaagg.

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u/ManOfDiscovery Oct 13 '21

No flag no country! Those are the rules…that I just made up.

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u/SeriousMemes Oct 13 '21

Amazing how much people care about honouring people who participated in previous wars and if you don't then you're seen as disrespectful.

If you question why they don't care about stuff like this, it's all "who cares, that happened so long ago it's in the past!"

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u/ntvirtue Oct 13 '21

Please share with us how to change events in the past.

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u/SeriousMemes Oct 13 '21

Exactly, so why does anyone give a shit about "war heroes" it's in the past

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u/Kered13 Oct 13 '21

The end is incorrect, it should show the remaining reservations today.

It also would help if it were much longer so the changes could be seen more easily.

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u/CarlSagans_Anus Oct 12 '21

This is a cool graphic! You should also include the reservations that were created. I think it would drive home the point that some of these people are still around, while showing what their lands have been reduced to pre/post colonization.

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u/qezler Oct 13 '21

Reservations are actually quite large! This is a more accurate map of US states.

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u/StarkillerX42 Oct 13 '21

Those are quite large, as long as you forget that we promised the entirety of Oklahoma and western Colorado as native land forever. It's also worth noting that North Eastern Arizona is the least resource-rich place I've been, and it's the largest reservation currently.

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u/AdmiralPoopbutt Oct 13 '21

You're 100% correct about NE Arizona. It's the last piece of land that nobody wanted. Doesn't even have particularly good scenery or tourism potential compared to other parts of the west.

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u/Thomas_c_compton Oct 13 '21

When route 66 was the main highway it actually was a pretty big tourist destination. You can still go to the main street of Winslow and find a bunch of old timers and motorcyclists touring it, but that is about all that is left of its former glory.

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u/AlotOfReading Oct 13 '21

It's filled with the same landforms as the grand canyon and southern Utah, what are you on about? The main difference is that it's drier and the canyons are carved deeper than Utah. There was also a much larger indigenous population up there than most of the modern US. You can barely throw a rock without hitting a native site in some areas.

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u/Disposable591 Oct 13 '21

Do we still have time to give Oklahoma back?

21

u/DUTCH_DUTCH_DUTCH Oct 13 '21

the Supreme Court sort of already did

McGirt v. Oklahoma, 591 U.S. ___ (2020), was a landmark[1][2] United States Supreme Court case which ruled that, as pertaining to the Major Crimes Act, much of the eastern portion of the state of Oklahoma remains as Native American lands of the prior Indian reservations of the Five Civilized Tribes, never disestablished by Congress as part of the Oklahoma Enabling Act of 1906. As such, prosecution of crimes by Native Americans on these lands falls into the jurisdiction of the tribal courts and federal judiciary under the Major Crimes Act, rather than Oklahoma's courts.

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u/hallese Oct 13 '21

According to the Supreme Court, we never properly stole Oklahoma in the first place.

2

u/cambiro Oct 13 '21

Only if we keep the panhandle.

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u/Jiddo21 Oct 13 '21

As long as you also forget that these places aren’t their ancestral homes, pipelines are still built through them, and they don’t have running water.

4

u/funk-it-all Oct 13 '21

And it's the shittiest land in the country that nobody wants anyway

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u/myindependentopinion Oct 14 '21

...shittiest land in the country that nobody wants

This isn't true for my tribe's reservation! We never left our Garden of Eden!

Thru 7 treaties 1817-1854 we ceded 10+ Million acres. Then in 1960's & 70's while our tribe was Terminated, there was a huge land grab (10K+ acres) of our pristine rez lands (w/largest virgin timber in WI/53 lakes/187 rivers & streams). All of it "stolen" (unceded by treaties) & our tribe didn't receive 1 penny from all of the land loss. Luckily we stopped the land sales before we lost everything & President Nixon reversed our Termination.

Scores of $$Millions land/homes were privatized & sold off to rich people like CEO's & VP's of F500 galore, investment bankers, sports figures, etc. as 2nd rec homes....Heck, 1 of Oprah's many homes was on our rez....Oprah didn't care it was stolen/she just sold it off to the next multi-m/billionaire!

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u/Jiddo21 Oct 13 '21

And some people say. “Just get over it, it’s in the past.” The effects and results are still relevant today. Native American women disappear more than any other demographic if I recall correctly.

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u/funk-it-all Oct 18 '21

Yes, and addiction rates are as high as ireland. No access to good food, often no running water.

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u/inaloop001 Oct 13 '21

It’s not colonization

It was Genocide.

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u/Monandobo Oct 13 '21

What’s the significance of the green dots on the map relative to the purple ones?

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u/jmc1996 Oct 13 '21

I think those are state-level reservations.

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u/Monandobo Oct 13 '21

Thank you!

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u/relddir123 Oct 13 '21

The website it came from says it’s from the Census. That page also has a detailed map that excludes the green dots, implying they’re not reservations. I couldn’t find that census data anywhere, but they definitely mean something else.

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u/f1fandf Oct 13 '21

I thought Oklahoma would have more land allocated for reservations, it seems pretty small reservation land.

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u/WolfgangAmadeusYoda Oct 13 '21

Not compared to where they used to live.

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u/Aeruthael Oct 13 '21

I never knew there were reservations in the eastern states as well, that's actually really good to know!

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u/Jack_of_all_offs Oct 13 '21

I live near the Onondaga reservation, in Central New York.

It's very small compared to other reservations. The map makes it look the size of the county, damn near.

It only holds around 500-1000 people (from guesswork comparing the 2010 census and info from 2014.)

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u/ScallopOolong Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

Yea, that map is extremely low resolution and uses dots for tiny reservations, making them look far larger than they are. In western Washington, for example, it shows all reservations looking about the size of the Quinault Reservation when most are little more than a few acres or a town, if that. Here is a better map of WA. Same deal with California. Those big dots look like they add up to quite a lot, whereas the reality is closer to this (even in that high res PDF many of the reservations are basically invisibly small—a few acres or less).

Further, it is common to show reservations as solid blocks when in reality most are highly fragmented with only small amounts actually under tribal control. For example, here is the Quinault Reservation, the 3rd largest in Washington—the green parts are held by the Quinault Nation, the pink is private owned, while the beige is land "held in trust" and "other"—some of which is owned by individual tribal members, thanks to Dawes Act style "allotments", but most are old allotments that have themselves been highly fragmented over 100+ years into an amazingly complex mess of ownership and "trust land". A lot of the beige colored land is technically owned by native individuals but is de facto controlled by timber companies.

Few if any larger reservations in the US are solid blocks of tribal land. Mostly they are gigantic messes like the Quinault Reservation.

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u/Jack_of_all_offs Oct 13 '21

Shit, super interesting!

Thanks for sharing and elaborating!

I had no idea there were so many tribes there!

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u/ScallopOolong Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

Yea, and some like the Colville are "confederations" of what were once many tribes that were forced together mainly against their will. The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the largest reservation in WA, is made up of 12 main tribes ("bands" they call them): The Chelan, Chief Joseph Band of Nez Perce, Colville, Entiat, Lakes, Methow, Moses-Columbia, Nespelem, Okanogan, Palus, San Poil, and Wenatchi peoples.

I grew up near Buffalo, not too far from the Tuscarora Reservation (and btw here is a better map of NY reservations). The history in NY vs. WA is quite different. The Iroquois/Haudenosaunee had perhaps 150 years between first contact and conquest, and were vital British allies in wars with the French and their native allies. By the time they were conquered there weren't many non-Iroquois tribes in upstate/western NY. In WA the process was much faster. First contact on the coast happened around 1780-1800, post-1800 in the interior, with conquest happening in the 1850s. Imperial powers did not ally and support tribes the way they did in the east with the Iroquois, Creek, Cherokee, etc etc. With few exceptions there wasn't time to self-organize into confederations as was common in the east—or even to recover from epidemics with super-high death rates. At least four smallpox epidemics wiped out 60-90% of the Pacific Northwest natives during the early 1800s. With the 1862 smallpox epidemic being deliberately spread throughout British Columbia, and into WA as well, by the colonial government in Victoria. Interestingly, that epidemic reached Alaska but fizzled there due to a vigorous Russian-American smallpox vaccination program among native peoples.

On the plus side some native cultures managed to hold on and are now asserting their rights. Interestingly many look to the Mohawk for inspiration in the fight for native rights. The Mohawk seem to be doing better than many—mainly in Canada I think. I'm not sure about the Seneca, but every person of Seneca ancestry I knew around Buffalo came from broken families rampant with alcoholism and abuse, and felt little to no connection to their heritage.

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u/Jack_of_all_offs Oct 13 '21

I watched a documentary recently about one tribe on the PNW coast that still fishes and smokes salmon, and wish I could remember the name.

It was bittersweet that they were still faithful to their ancestral traditions, but there were so few doing it.

And as far as the Senecas go, my experience with Onondagans and Cayugans is fairly similar. The reservations are rife with poverty and alcoholism. Some really great people, though, just rough circumstances. Their combined tribes only have a dozen or so living members that can even speak the languages. I knew a few of the Onondagan guys that were assaulted by the NYS troopers in the 90s over the I-81 blockade and sued the state. And I knew another guy that was routinely contracted by the Federal government to supervise construction projects in order to monitor the unearthing of artifacts. He carved me a tiny wolf out of stone and I cherish it. Haven't thought about those guys in a few years...

Thanks again for sharing!

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u/BuffaloStoner Oct 13 '21

Same with the ones over by buffalo. Makes it look like the several square mile Seneca nation is the size of Niagara county

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u/Cesia_Barry Oct 13 '21

Can you slow it down, or make it pauseable? It’s incredible & I want to explore.

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u/2fuzz714 Oct 13 '21

Redditors: It's too fast.

Indigenous: No shit.

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u/FallenOne_ Oct 13 '21

It is pauseable. What app are you using where you can't do that?

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u/piperdaniel1 Oct 13 '21

It doesn't pause on the official Reddit mobile app on android for me

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u/the_trees_bees Oct 13 '21

3rd party apps are actually way better than the official Reddit app. I like Relay for Reddit. Sync for Reddit is good too.

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u/royalhawk345 Oct 13 '21

official Reddit mobile app

Well there's your problem

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u/Cesia_Barry Oct 13 '21

Mac desktop--not using the app.

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u/TravisAxe Oct 13 '21

Would like to see a map of Canada and all the other Americas as well.

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u/raverbashing Oct 13 '21

Ah no it was totally different in Canada. The Canadians sent the Natives to the school and everybody lived happily ever /s

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u/DAMAN2U1 Oct 13 '21

This is absolutely pointless at this speed.

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u/MoenTheSink Oct 13 '21

Between the map errors and the speed...not sure how this was thought to be ready for public consumption.

Its comically fast to the point of being an before/after slide

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u/ohwow234 Oct 12 '21

As nice as the map is, it’s wrong. Up until 1846, half of the American country belonged to Mexico. It was with the Guadalupe Hidalgo treaty that some stupid guy decided to sign and gave it away

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u/wheniaminspaced Oct 13 '21

It was with the Guadalupe Hidalgo treaty that some stupid guy decided to sign and gave it away

There are many fair criticisms to be made about the Mexican-American war, but Mexico signing the treaty is not one of them. They had lost control of the country, the treaty disposed of territory Mexico had questionable control of from the very start and got them that control back without a potentially very long bloody conflict.

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u/snootyfungus Oct 13 '21

Not to mention its terms were far more favorable than most Democrats wanted. The US delegate basically went rogue and when Polk found out, he was furious.

US troops had an incredible showing in the war, had occupied the capital and brought Mexico to its knees, and Mexico got to keep most of their territory and a $15 million payment from the US, all when the American president and leading members of his party were hoping for more aggressive cessions or even complete annexation of Mexico.

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u/MSDOS401 Oct 13 '21

How would history play out if we had annexed all of Mexico?

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u/CaptainBallz Oct 13 '21

Yellow filter on all American movies?

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u/Public-Indication179 Oct 13 '21

American cowboys would wear sombreros instead of cowboy hats.

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u/TuckerMcG Oct 13 '21

Based on how the history with native Americans played out, I don’t think sombreros would really exist anymore.

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u/moonshipcc Oct 13 '21

You say that like nearly the exact same thing didnt happen in Mexico and the rest of the continent. You ever look at Mexican politicians? I'll bet you they aren't Aztecs. What language do they speak in Mexico?

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u/[deleted] Oct 13 '21

Lmao everybody seems to forget the spanish and portuguese were some of the biggest colonisers, they literally divided south america up by drawing a vertical line through the continent and 50/50-ing it. (the Treaty of Tordesillas).

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u/[deleted] Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

Don't forget that the French ran one of the most profitable early colonies, and not much later the Dutch Belgium committed one of the worst single atrocities of the slave/colony era.

Edit: Very sorry for the mistype above.

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u/Links_to_Magic_Cards Oct 13 '21

which was that by the dutch?

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u/infrikinfix Oct 13 '21

Tacos, burritos and nachos would be staple foods...oh, wait.

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u/Fondren_Richmond Oct 13 '21

Defacto instatement of slavery south of the Rio Grande given the inability to regulate it, possibly a teaser trailer for post-bellum American South that may then never come to pass.

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u/IM_BAD_PEOPLE Oct 13 '21

I’m actually very interested in this alternative history exercise.

If we annex Mexico, the Zimmerman telegram is never sent, and America doesn’t enter WWI (maybe). The impact of unrestricted submarine warfare being the the biggest factor.

How does America respond to the constant rebellions in Mexico? Do we stop at the Southern Mexican border, or do we continue into South America.

How much more involved to we become in Latin America during the 70-80s covert war on drugs/Communism.

Could be a fascinating thing to explore.

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u/dubiousadvocate Oct 13 '21

Call Harry Turtledove!

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u/snootyfungus Oct 13 '21

"How will my day play out if I eat lunch at 11:30 instead of 11:15?"

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u/[deleted] Oct 12 '21

[deleted]

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u/das_war_ein_Befehl Oct 13 '21

Native opposition really didn’t fall to the level of a nation-state type threat. The numbers involved were always pretty small, and if Mexico couldn’t stand up to the US militarily, then neither could the natives.

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u/your_covers_blown Oct 13 '21

Some of the natives were a real impediment to settlement of the western US. That treaty actually required that the US control and prevent attacks from Apaches across the border. Mexico never substantially settled most of the acquired territory in part because of native resistance.

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u/infrikinfix Oct 13 '21

The Apaches and Comanche were more like a miniature rival empires (though decentralized) . Most of the land that we took from them they had only recently took from other tribes.

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u/Public-Indication179 Oct 13 '21

So they were the American Mongols!

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u/thefullmcnulty Oct 13 '21

The Comanche actually were. It took the US military 40 years of concerted effort to subdue them. No other native population was able to put up similar resistance.

The Comanche were the finest Calvary in North America hands down. They bested the Apache (among many other tribes) and they stopped Spanish colonial expansion on what is (roughly) the present day US-Mexico border for decades.

The Comanche were unbelievably skilled Calvary warriors and practically lived on their horses. They utilized Calvary techniques that the Mongols also implemented. Check out Empire of the Summer Moon if you’re interested in this period of history.

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u/I_Am_Become_Dream Oct 13 '21

The Comanche were unbelievably skilled Calvary warriors and practically lived on their horses.

This is really interesting considering they didn't even have horses until the 17th Century.

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u/burkiniwax Oct 13 '21

Comanches didn't exist as a separate people until horses. They broke away from the Shoshone.

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u/thefullmcnulty Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

Empire of the Summer Moon details how of all North American indigenous people, for unknown reasons, the Comanche took to horse-fare the best. In a short period of time they adapted in an almost unbelievable way and it gave them an advantage no other tribes/sects could match. Their mastery was that thorough.

The book does detail how they were effectively a bullied and destitute “tribe” at the turn of the 16-17th century when horses were first stolen from the Spaniards. It does seem it was an imperative for their plight as a war-ravaged and oft bullied group.

Edit: …and in turn, the bullied tend to become bullies if given the opportunity in the future. The history of the Comanche is a good indicator as to why they were a particularly brutal people. Their enjoyment of torture, rape and extreme bloodshed seems to stem from centuries of abuse at the hands of others before they rose to prominence.

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u/Public-Indication179 Oct 13 '21

Very interesting info, thanks for sharing 🙏🏻

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u/barryhakker Oct 13 '21

People adapt quickly. Plenty of lifetimes to get the hang of that horse stuff apparently. Also, out of dozens (hundreds?) of peoples trying to adapt the horse in a short period of time there are bound to be some significantly more successful than others for not always obvious reasons.

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u/Apercent Oct 13 '21

He wasn't stupid, he had no choice in the matter.

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u/Makabeli Oct 13 '21

This is inaccurate. The Iroquois Confederacy held much larger portions of New York until 1788. They wouldn't shrink to the represented size for 4 more years.

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u/Valentin3288 Oct 13 '21

I never understood why in many instances of history we have people fighting and taking land from others, even the native Americans fought eachother often, Yet when it comes to Americans doing something it’s inherently the worst evil ever? Why do Americans have so much self loathing when literally every country has some sort of terrible history and never mentions it anymore lol

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u/data_etc OC: 14 Oct 12 '21

Data source: Library of Congress. Schedule of Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784-1894. United States Serial Set, Number 4015.

Map made with d3.js and topojson.js.

Read more at : https://www.dataetc.org/2021/10/11/native-america.html

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u/Benjamin-Doverman Oct 13 '21

Can you make it go faster

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u/Buck_Thorn Oct 13 '21

I was exiting out when I saw your comment at the very last second. Had to come back in to let you know that you made me laugh. Thanks.

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u/ELKronos Oct 13 '21

Unfortunately this happened over a hundred years ago. There is the chance that if someone invented a time machine and brought back technological advancements they could - in theory - make the cession occur at a faster rate. However, it would be unwise to alter the timeline in such a drastic way.

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u/hey_heaux1111 Oct 13 '21

I think they were referring to the animation lol

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u/thebackupquarterback Oct 13 '21

They know they were just being funny.

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u/myindependentopinion Oct 14 '21

This map is inaccurate. All was not ceded. Where are our reservations???? (I live on my rez in WI) There should be at least 326 reservations.

You should show the tribal lands we held on to. See the BIA map here!

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u/johnnyringo1985 Oct 13 '21

This is wrong. Tribal reservations existed in eastern Oklahoma after 1893.

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u/Fomoreddit73 Oct 13 '21

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/_IaLA6ZTr33bgeb8-iGvr0RcOBQ=/1200x0/filters:no_upscale()/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/3702464/native-american-land__.0.0.gif/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorusasset/file/3702464/native-american-land_.0.0.gif) This was a good interpretation of the data as well.

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u/Flashdancer405 Oct 13 '21

I bet its a real shitshow if I sort by controversial

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u/klydefrog89 Oct 13 '21

Indigenous people.. or just actual Americans not them blow ins from Europe etc

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u/freelancespaghetti Oct 13 '21

Yeah, this visualization helps (despite how fast it is lol), but it's a hard thing to really understand.

I think what hit me was visiting the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian. It's an absolutely amazing museum, and I highly recommend it if you're on the Mall.

In that museum they have one section with Presidential Treaty Medallions, and there are tons of the damn things. I mean, they must have been minting them like Mario coins.

And what you realize is that every one, every single one, is a promise followed by a betrayal. Shit, some of them are lined up three or four deep for the same people, president, and receding land! Promise "keep your land as is," broken two years later, promise "keep you land as is now," broken three years later, promise...

I mean, can you even imagine the absolute feeling of helplessness. The most powerful person on the continent promises that you have succeeded. They'll stamp their own name into gold and silver to mark that you and your family can keep yours. .... Only to have it fall away in a few years, or even months. Over and over again.

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u/durrettd Oct 13 '21

This is an interesting gif executed exceptionally poorly. It doesn’t communicate anything, really.

First, slow it down. It’s a lot to digest over 100 years. Next, provide an updated year range over time to see the evolution of the absorption by year or decade. Third, there are native Indian lands to this day not represented in this graphic.

This had the potential to be informative and moving. Instead it was lazy and propagandistic.

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u/iSkinMonkeys Oct 13 '21

One of the stupidest development in Western nations, especially among their white liberal populations, has been this compartmentalization of treatment of "indigenous people" as something way beyond horrible compared to what happened in other parts of the world.

Land is land. If two groups of people want to occupy same piece of land, why are people shocked that they will fight over it and group with superior strength would win and eliminate all sources of future conflicts?

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u/TysonL91 Oct 13 '21

About that time to play red dead Redemption 2

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u/ZorroReddit Oct 13 '21

Way to fast. Everything disappears in one second.

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u/IndifferentSkeptic Oct 12 '21

Those natives should have built a wall

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u/JENSTHEBRAVE Oct 13 '21

As always, Hawai’i is left completely unrecognized despite also being a land taken by nefarious means.

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u/PNW_Vandy Oct 13 '21

Hawaiians were not American Indians and so their land does not fall under tribal land cessions—a term of art. Neither does the land of Native Alaskans (also missing from this graphic).

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u/MxSirene Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

This entire continent was taken by nefarious means.

Keep the same old bullshit racist comments justifying genocide coming, idiots. I'll just keep blocking you.

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u/resumethrowaway222 Oct 13 '21

The entire planet was taken by nefarious means.

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u/Sternjunk Oct 13 '21

Any place where there are people was taken by nefarious means.

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u/JENSTHEBRAVE Oct 13 '21

True that. As is most land unfortunately.

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u/Albo888 Oct 13 '21

Just like every place on earth

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u/Bill_Biscuits Oct 13 '21

Easy with those facts, big fella

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u/[deleted] Oct 13 '21

You’re describing the history of the world.

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u/dreg102 Oct 14 '21

By literal definition its not genocide.

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u/unicodePicasso Oct 13 '21

Serious question, what is there to be done about it? Like, the US treated Native Americans terribly sure, but like, they also can’t give the land back. There are cities built there now. Massive infrastructure supporting millions of people. It can’t just be like, turned back over. What more can be done besides just like, saying sorry?

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u/moistpup Oct 13 '21

Even if Europeans had arrived in the Americas with altruistic intentions of developing trade treaties with sovereign Native American nations, the result of contact would have been a disaster for Native Americans. Nearly 90% of their population was killed by diseases brought by Europeans.

Basically the American continents would have been nearly depopulated as a result of any initial exposure to Europeans.

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u/Capable_Buddy_581 Oct 13 '21

Make a woke holiday that a bunch of white suburbanites on reddit can circle jerk about every year.

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u/bosser_15 Oct 13 '21

Google Doodles and made up holidays mostly.

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u/progeda Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

You take the L? If you can't defend land you can't own it. Natives took over land from other tribes for ages. Those that could defend it kept it.

Regardless, Europeans could of arrived singing songs and carrying flowers and 90% of natives would of still died from disease.

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u/stewpidazzol Oct 12 '21

Reading Empire of the Summer Moon right now. Good read.

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u/CoronaBud Oct 13 '21

Very misleading as it shows no tribal land left at the end of the graph, there are a lot of reservations left in the US (although not nearly as much as there should be and the US moved tons of natives away from their historical tribal lands)

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u/giggidy88 Oct 13 '21

Usa undefeated against stone/Bronze Age tribes!

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u/lsdiesel_1 Oct 13 '21

“WE WANT BAMA” - 16th century United States military

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u/MR_COOL_ICE_ Oct 12 '21

I’m curious who those last tribes were? Navajo? Apache?

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u/Tark1nn Oct 13 '21

Is cession the good word here ? Then maybe we can rename our old european "colony maps" to "foreign ceded lands". Maybe as a non native english speaker i didn't understand the word but that's my thought

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u/Vanadium_CoffeeCup Oct 13 '21

God damn immigrants!! Taking our land, they don't speak our language, don't share our belief...

History is a tv show and it's looping non-stop

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u/Artemis9377 Oct 13 '21

Colonialism in a nutshell

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u/AstralHeathen Oct 13 '21

More apt title

'Map of Tribal Genocides committed by encroaching U.S.Government.'

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u/spoinkable Oct 13 '21

"cessions" lol, that makes it sound so fair and diplomatic

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u/epic_tea_tus Oct 13 '21

This looks like a good animation, why not slow it down so we can enjoy it? This may as well be a two frame “animation” that simply removes all color from the map.

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u/Careless_Bat2543 Oct 13 '21

This is the opposite of data is beautiful, way too fast and no way to tell which tribes (even major tribes) are which.

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u/DivineCurses Oct 13 '21

Why are the Great Lakes colored in the same as Canada?

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u/dankwoodsmcgee Oct 13 '21

Now show it going back in Oklahoma in recent years!

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u/Asem1989 Oct 13 '21

Sure looks a lot like another place being taken by European settlers.

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u/DrQuailMan OC: 1 Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

This is incorrect. Most tribal land in California was already "ceded" to Mexico at various points prior to the US acquiring it, but here you have all that land being ceded in 1848 when the US acquired California from Mexico. It makes it look like one huge wave of tribes being dispossessed, when in fact in 1848 much of the land hadn't been possessed by tribes for a long time.

Edit: they were apparently only officially ceded in 1851.

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u/blast_mastaCM Oct 13 '21

“See we need this land to build a Wal-Mart”

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u/therealshaquille Oct 13 '21

They never ceded most of this land. This is actually more a map of broken treaties

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u/[deleted] Oct 13 '21

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u/Texican1836 Oct 13 '21

They stole it from the bison. Who they then waged a genocidal war against. And took their meat and skin as spoil.

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u/soviyet Oct 13 '21

If you divided the area of the continental united states by the native population in 1784 you'd get about 6 square miles per person.

This map is a bit misleading.

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u/3189025 Oct 13 '21

If it wasn’t for colonization most countries would still be in the dark ages so your welcome.

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u/[deleted] Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

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u/Analretentivebastard Oct 13 '21

This is utter bs. Please play the visuals before Europeans and how they were killing each other for hundreds of years for territory that modern “historians” claim were always settled by certain tribes

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u/shun1999 Oct 12 '21

story not over…lets see 100yrs+…200yrs+….etc…😂

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u/RockyClub Oct 13 '21

They should show the reservations still in existence. https://native-land.ca/

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u/rzarectz Oct 13 '21

Continental genocide represented in 3 seconds. Heartbreaking stuff.

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u/KGrahnn Oct 13 '21

This is what humans do. My needs go over your needs.

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u/lvlatthevv Oct 13 '21

Yea, just like the Aztecs ritualistically torturing and murdering children to the rain gods. Culturee

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u/nickthestick1234 Oct 13 '21

Careful. They’re not white, so if you shit on their “culture”, you’re racist. It’s okay to shit on white people since “we don’t have culture”

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u/Prof_Acorn OC: 1 Oct 13 '21

Misspelled "annexations" :-p

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u/[deleted] Oct 13 '21

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u/[deleted] Oct 13 '21

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u/kearsargeII Oct 13 '21 edited Oct 13 '21

The wheel was invented twice, as far as we can tell, once in the old world, with everyone who interacted with people who used wheels copying it, and once in the new world, where it was mostly used in childrens toys in mesoamerica as they lacked the sort of large domestic animal that would allow them to make the jump to making carts more viable. For an invention that simple, it does not seem to have been developed independently more than those two times, and it was only seriously used for things other than childrens toys one of those two times. It took thousands of years for the Egyptians to adopt the use of wheels for transport, with their big adoption only coming once a group that used chariots outright invaded them, and they were able to see the benefits of wheeled vehicles firsthand.

I really doubt that Columbus ever even noticed that they had no wheels. I cannot find a quote of him talking about their lack of wheels, and that is a pretty strange thing for him to go out of his way to notice when he probably did not give a shit about wheels or their lack therof.

Edit: for that matter, I don't even think that he would think that it was unusual. The Spanish just got done conquering the Canary Islands and were busy destroying the culture of the native Guanache peoples, which were a paleolithic culture that did not use wheels. When your closest comparison to an islander people that you find is another islander people which did not use wheels, then there is no reason to really highlight it as something unusual, which is why columbus was probably more busy writing about how healthy the Taino were and their ignorance of christianity, highlighting hammocks as a useful invention for sailing, or free-associating the peoples he found with Asia or Eden.

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u/[deleted] Oct 13 '21

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u/bacondamagecontroll Oct 13 '21

How do you believe that such diversities of people all shared one brain??? Do you think it was just song and dance an everyone got along? No different groups fought over land and resources.

"On the Western Plains, pre‐Columbian warfare—before the introduction of horses and guns—pitted tribes against one another for control of territory and its resources,"

https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780195071986.001.0001/acref-9780195071986-e-0618#:\~:text=The%20significance%20of%20warfare%20varied%20tremendously%20among%20the,a%20means%20of%20coping%20with%20grief%20and%20depopulation.

"Fortified sites were part of the defensive strategy of all Northwest Coast groups for at least 2,000 years. Captain James Cook was so impressed with one Haida fort off the west coast of Graham Island that he called it Hippah Island after the Maori forts he had seen in New Zealand. Military defences at Haida forts included stout palisades, rolling top-log defences, heavy trapdoors and fighting platforms supplied with stores of large boulders to hurl at invaders."

https://www.historymuseum.ca/cmc/exhibitions/aborig/haida/havwa01e.html#:\~:text=The%20Haida%20went%20to%20war%20to%20acquire%20objects,ransom%20such%20as%20crest%20designs%2C%20dances%20and%20songs.

"Archaeological evidence confirms the prominent role of warfare in indigenous societies well before the arrival of permanent European settlers. As early as the year 1000, for example, Huron, Neutral, Petun and Iroquois villages were increasingly fortified by a timber palisade that could be nearly 10 metres in height, sometimes villages built a second or even third ring to protect them against attacks by enemy nations. Craig Keener has described how these structures became larger and more elaborate through to the 1500s, with logs as large as 24 inches in diameter being used to construct the multi-layered defences, an enormous investment in communal labour that the villagers would not have made had it not been deemed necessary. Sieges and assaults on such fortified villages therefore must have occurred before Europeans arrived, and were certainly evident in the 17th and 18th Centuries. War also fuelled the development of highly complex political systems among these Iroquoian nations. The great confederacies, such as the Iroquois Confederation of Five Nations and the Huron Confederacy, probably created in the late 16th Century, grew out of their members’ desire to stem the fratricidal wars that had been ravaging their societies for hundreds of years. They were organized around the Confederacy Council, which ruled on inter-tribal disputes in order to settle differences without bloodshed. The Councils also discussed matters of foreign policy, such as the organization of military expeditions and the creation of alliances."

https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/services/military-history/history-heritage/popular-books/aboriginal-people-canadian-military/warfare-pre-columbian-north-america.html

Didn't believe in land ownership eh????? LOL

You have a gullibility issue my friend, you can't believe every simple concept that comes your way, even if it aligns with your worldview.

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u/xxxxNikita Oct 13 '21

Lmao. Now you say " U.S. government" Why why other countries don't get that "government" word when someone mentions their fuck ups?? Unbiased Reddit

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u/sbsb27 Oct 13 '21

Wait a minute. Yes, land was continually stolen by government and private companies and individuals. But there is still land in native hands. Why is that not depicted?

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u/SpuddMeister Oct 13 '21

Many colleges and universities were created by using the wealth of these tribal lands.

From the early to mid-19th century the federal government, through 162 violence-backed cessions, expropriated approximately 10.7 million acres of land from 245 tribal nations and divided it into roughly 80,000 parcels for redistribution.

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