r/dataisbeautiful OC: 5 Oct 09 '21 Narwhal Salute 1 Bravo Grande! 2 Starstruck 1 Vote Local! 1 Silver 43 Helpful 39 Wholesome 25 Hugz 22 Wearing is Caring 2 Gold 7 Faith In Humanity Restored 1 'MURICA 2 All-Seeing Upvote 3 Take My Energy 2 Heartwarming 1

[OC] The Pandemic in the US in 60 Seconds OC

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61.1k Upvotes

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u/semipro_redditor Oct 09 '21 Hugz

I watched that whole thing just to feel the relief of may-July of 2021 again haha

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u/TurquoiseLuck Oct 09 '21 Hugz

I'm not from the US so it was like

"Oh this is interesting, okay not too bad, oh dear that's pretty bad, okay I guess it's getting better, hey nice looks like it's winding down I see why they don't want to wear masks anymo-OH GOD OH SHIT OH FUCK WHAT"

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u/Hexegesis Oct 09 '21 Hugz

OH GOD OH SHIT OH FUCK WHAT

That's what we call the Delta effect.

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u/Synensys Oct 09 '21

Love how you can clearly see the delta wave originating in the Ozarks and Gulf Coast resort areas and spreading from there.

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u/marsupialham Oct 10 '21

The Delta Advantage™

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u/TediousStranger Oct 09 '21 edited Oct 09 '21 Helpful Wholesome Hugz

... pretty much how it felt to be here.

i didn't wear a mask in May or June, it was amazing, then 4th of July rolled around and by August our shit was fucked again

edit: no, I was not out partying and "living it up" in the time that i wasn't wearing a mask. I was doing fun activities such as going to the grocery store maskless at 7am when there were maybe two other people there. or picking up contactless carry-out without putting on a mask where when you pick up your food, you don't even run into another human being. By May I had been vaccinated for 2 months and let me remind everyone that the CDC said that going without a mask was ok if you were vaccinated.

otherwise I was still living in isolation. saw via reddit etc what a shit show July 4th was and started masking again, regardless of CDC guidance because Delta showed up to kick ass and they were stunningly silent. retail locations still have "if you're fully vaccinated you don't have to wear a mask" signs, and I ignore them.

where I live is fairly rural and our cases didn't pick back up again until mid-August. that's about... 6 weeks after I started masking again.

no, I do not believe that I was "part of the problem" so please stop asking. I have been unemployed since 2020. i have not seen my family in nearly 2 years. my partner left me. i have been heavily medicated on antidepressants for just over a year now. trust me, I have been in isolation, moreso than most people.

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u/pmshard Oct 09 '21

Hope life gets a bit better for you soon TS.

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u/IDF13 Oct 10 '21

Ignore the haters, and good luck navigating where you are now.

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u/camdoodlebop Oct 09 '21

it’s weird how july 2021 feels like a lifetime ago

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u/Weebs Oct 09 '21

Agreed, and yet somehow my mind still thinks it's 2020, every time I read the date it's jarring

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u/cokakatta Oct 09 '21

For so long last year I could barely believe it was past April. Like time froze. We have plants, though, and they kept changing with the season.

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u/Neapola Oct 09 '21 Silver All-Seeing Upvote

January 22nd, 2020:

(Reporter: "Are there worries about a pandemic at this point?")

Trump: "No. Not at all. We have it totally under control. It's one person coming in from China, and we have it under control. It's, uh, gonna be just fine."

February 10th, 2020:

“Now, the virus that we’re talking about having to do — you know, a lot of people think that goes away in April with the heat, as the heat comes in. Typically, that will go away in April. We’re in great shape, though. We have 12 cases, 11 cases, and many of them are in good shape now.”

February 11th, 2020:

"By April, you know in theory when it gets a little warmer it miraculously goes away."

February 24th, 2020:

"The Coronavirus is very much under control in the USA. We are in contact with everyone and all relevant countries. CDC & World Health have been working hard and very smart. Stock Market starting to look very good to me!"

February 26th, 2020:

“We’re going to be pretty soon at only five people. And we could be at just one or two people over the next short period of time. So we’ve had very good luck.”

March 7th, 2020:

"I'm not concerned at all."

March 13th, 2020:

"I don't take responsibility at all."

April 23rd, 2020

"And then I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in a minute. One minute. And is there a way we can do something like that, by injection inside or almost a cleaning. Because you see it gets in the lungs and it does a tremendous number on the lungs. So it would be interesting to check that."

July 19th, 2020

"I will be right eventually. You know, I said, 'It's going to disappear.' I'll say it again. ... It's going to disappear, and I'll be right."

July 28th, 2020

Over 140,000 deaths total. 1,114 deaths that day alone.

“They are dying. That’s true, and — it is what it is.”

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u/NfamousKaye Oct 09 '21

Man Trump just live spitballing that we drink disinfectant seems like ages ago but no…no that was last year 🤦🏽‍♀️

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u/viperone Oct 09 '21 Wholesome

We're getting there again. It'll be slow going and I'm sure that the holidays will bring a bit more cases afterwards, but with luck there might be a light at the end of the tunnel. School surges were one of the last big things I can think of in introducing a majority unvaccinated population together, as we've seen concerts, fairs, sports, all kinds of things without much of a change. If kids are able to get it before the holidays, I would hope it pulls a Spanish Flu and yeets itself around the two year mark. International will still be a tricky thing for a while, but hopefully by this time next year in the US things will be approaching 2019 normality, with no thought to any restrictions, masks, altered hours, whatever. It'll still take a bit to get to a full pre-2020 feeling, but I'm hopeful we will before the next presidential election cycle.

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u/semipro_redditor Oct 09 '21

Thanks for that, it’s really nice to hear other people being hopeful!!

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u/inglandation Oct 09 '21

Another hopeful thing is access to vaccines for children (coming in a few weeks) and oral antivirals like the one that recently passed phase 3. Few cases and good treatment will bring an end to the pandemic. We're getting there.

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u/PaperNeither4583 Oct 09 '21

I was living in the south eastern corner of Montana last year, really crazy to see a visualization of just how isolated we were. I didn't hear of a confirmed case until sometime in september.

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u/Reader01234567 Oct 09 '21

As someone who was living in a city with a couple million people last year, that's insane. We had refrigerated trucks next to hospitals because the morgues were full. Super creepy to bike past.

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u/Adodie Oct 09 '21

Yeah, the degree to which folks have had different pandemic experiences is just insane.

I started out the pandemic in Oregon, which generally (until Delta) has had very low spread. Of my entire social circle, I know only 2 people who've had COVID -- and I don't know either of them particularly well. Both had mild cases. Of my close friends, nobody has had it.

Meanwhile, I hear stories on Reddit of people who've known multiple people die from it...and it just is so alien to my experience. Crazy

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u/relddir123 Oct 09 '21

I live in Arizona but go to school in DC. I know two people who got CoViD. Meanwhile, there’s a giant memorial with one flag for each of the 700,000+ deaths out next to the Washington Monument. It’s so jarring to see just how much it has affected others

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u/si4ci7 Oct 09 '21

I live in Rhode Island and I know two people who have had Covid, they were both last year and asymptomatic. Haven’t seen a breakthrough case in my social circle yet.

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u/[deleted] Oct 09 '21

[deleted]

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u/Bernies_left_mitten Oct 09 '21

Sorry for your loss of a friend, man.

Texas here. I feel your pain, bud. My circle is about half docs/medical, and a bunch of scientists as well. Most quite diligent and cautious. I know at least a dozen or two who caught it. Fortunately, almost all are young (20s/30s) and had solid recoveries with no known long-term issues. My mom, on the other hand, has lost multiple friends abruptly and rapidly to it.

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u/ForkAKnife Oct 09 '21 edited Oct 10 '21 Tearing Up

I live in Oregon, moved here in 2019. I have an aunt that lives outside of a town of 2000 people in Texas and calls me every couple of months. For a long time, she’d brag about how low cases are out there, how nobody she knows has it, they’re immune to the virus. Then a cousin told me her son’s crossfit gym owner had COVID, died, all the gym members went to the funeral, all got COVID. Her granddaughter got COVID from her boyfriend. Another granddaughter had a baby, they were all unmasked at the baby meeting, everyone got COVID. Obviously auntie was in denial.

Now she calls me in tears breaking down because so many adults at her church are dying and leaving orphans with nobody but the older members to care for the kids since they’re in such a remote area. She’s in her 80s, almost blind, husband has cancer and she’s calling me crying because she wants to take in Covid orphans from her church but knows in her heart it’s way too much responsibility.

The part in the animation where blue turns black in Oregon? That’s where the CDC said we didn’t need to wear masks anymore and Kate Brown stupidly went along with it. We never stopped masking, in public or at work. I know nobody in Oregon who has gotten Covid.

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u/SnooTangerines4257 Oct 09 '21

In Texas also, and my mother in law’s boyfriend passed away and two of her friends - one in the last few weeks. My husband has lasting side effects from Covid and has been out of work for over a year. I am just grateful my husband is alive and I just wish people would stop touching me. I work in retail and people have started touching me again.

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u/Justryan95 Oct 09 '21

I live in the DC area too. I only know of 2 people who got COVID, one which was my mom but that's because both of them are Nurses and they caught COVID March 2020. I know of nobody who's died of COVID, not even a distant friend of a friend or family of a friend. Vaccines are great and I'm not family and friends with that many stupid misinformation type of people.

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u/myrahenry23 Oct 09 '21

I live in Arizona too and it greatly affected the Navajo Nation. There were morgue trucks parked outside Flagstaff Medical Center. We’re u in Cave Creek or Scottsdale because from what I remember AZ got it bad thanks to Gov Douchey

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u/RealStumbleweed Oct 09 '21

Yeah, you can see it through this data as the northern counties, which are largely populated by Native Americans, have a much greater incidence than in more southern counties. But, yes, thanks, Ducey. I love how the Democratic mayors from Tucson, Phoenix, Tolleson, and Flagstaff kept giving him 'problems' throughout the pandemic. https://ktar.com/story/3707821/4-arizona-mayors-accuse-gov-doug-ducey-of-failed-leadership-on-covid/

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u/kittyCatalina98 Oct 09 '21

I live in one of the only counties in Virginia that didn't go 100+/100k. It's weird, because everyone knows someone who knows someone who died from it, but very fewer people know someone who died from it. Everyone knows someone who had it, but many few have had it. Hell, when I caught it, I lowered the "COVID Bacon" number of most people I know.

Meanwhile I have friends in NY and NJ who are mourning the deaths of half a dozen, and friends across the world for whom COVID is just that thing that makes you go into lockdown every few months.

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u/_OriamRiniDadelos_ Oct 09 '21 edited Oct 11 '21 Helpful

It’s fascinating how brutally diferente the experience of the same events can be from person to person. I bet some people just felt the inconvenience of quarantines and closed businesses, and just keep on with as if nothing changed much.

Wow first award! Thankyou. I guess that’s what I get for posting something sensible on a popular tread.

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u/dm_me_kittens Oct 09 '21

As a HCW we are inundated with covid information, especially in a southern state. I go to work and everyone is wearing at least a mask, code team and respiratory are wearing N95 and face shields everywhere. However when I go to the gym I'm the only one wearing a mask.

HCW and non HCW live in completely different worlds.

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u/kittyCatalina98 Oct 09 '21

Yeah, I know a few people for whom it's just been inconvenient. However, I also know quite a few chronically ill people (and am chronically ill myself) and this whole thing has been a disaster for us, not just bc of extra precautions, but bc healthcare resources are so out of wack right now.

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u/mirshafie Oct 09 '21

Yeah, that part is often overlooked when we talk about health care being overwhelmed. It clearly has been overwhelmed when people who were regularly getting health care services can no longer receive them because the hospitals are busy with covid.

It really rubbed me the wrong way to watch Joe Rogan brag about how he got better so quickly after getting Ivermectin. He just casually glossed over the fact that he also got monoclonal antibodies, apparently completely oblivious to how effective they are, how most people with covid can just dream about getting them, and how people who need them for chronic conditions can no longer get them so that rich assholes like him can get bailed out when they get covid.

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u/mafulazula Oct 09 '21 Starry

Gee, it’s almost like Joe Rogan is a complete and utter fucking moron who nobody should waste their time on.

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u/isleftisright Oct 09 '21

I feel like the overwhelming of the system was mentioned a lot. It simply wasnt internalised.

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u/_OriamRiniDadelos_ Oct 09 '21

I always wondered how terrible it must be for hospitals in general and people who have to get surgeries or constantly go to hospitals in particular(I don’t know, diálisis, chemotherapy, some conditions).

I’m sure it’s different everywhere, but in most cases it has had to get worse right?

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u/kittyCatalina98 Oct 09 '21

It absolutely has become a lot worse. I had to quit physical therapy because my heart and joints make it dangerous to do many of the exercises unmonitored and they stopped all in-person appointments. Wait times for non-COVID lab work spiked. In-person appointments, even for things like physical medicine for joint disorders, were cancelled. Non-emergency surgeries were cancelled or postponed. Psychiatric services became even more swamped, with wait times at one point doubling for an already critically overbooked area like mine.

I have arguably some of the best access to healthcare in the US for the middle-class (Kaiser Permanente mid-Atlantic) and that's just what happened in my experience. I know others for whom it's been even worse.

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u/Huffleduffer Oct 09 '21

I live in Alabama, and we were having some pretty high numbers for awhile. However, I haven't lost anyone close to me, and most in my distant circles have had it. And I haven't gotten it yet.

But you're right, it's weird to see people who have barely been effected by it, and then others who have been tremendously effected by it.

I will say this, it's interesting to see the people who don't have much personal experience with it, and see who believes it's fake because "it hasn't effected me" and then those who say "the few I know who have it say it's awful and I don't want it" and follow all the precautions.

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u/TweektheGeek Oct 09 '21

I live in Northeast Oklahoma and work at a very public place. Every unvaccinated employee gas caught COVID more than once.

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u/kittyCatalina98 Oct 09 '21

Oh goodness. I barely managed catching it once

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u/meatball77 Oct 09 '21

I'm in NJ, things were bad in the beginning. Once mask mandates went into effect we were better. Right now things are fine. I suspect we will have large vaccination rates when kids can get their shots and our cases will tank.

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u/fuckinlikerabbits Oct 09 '21

Hell, I'm in a big city in Texas, and I only personally know two people who have tested positive. Both last year. One of them had some lasting joint pain, and the other took a while to get their smell back. But that's it. I mean, it's out there. Our hospitals are still full. But in 18+ months of a pandemic, across my entire network of friends and family, I can only think of two people who got it.

And, I guess, one brief coworker in another part of the country had a mild case, and I heard that a parent of my wife's coworker, in another part of the country, apparently died herman cain style recently. But I don't really know either of those people.

And we've had kids under 12 in school since last October. Wife works with school age children all over town. We've been to stadiums and music festivals and weddings and occasionally restaurants this year, even a resort (that I was admittedly nervous about). We're vaccinated, of course. It really is wild how different people's experiences have been.

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u/the_baby_bear Oct 09 '21

That’s insane to me. I’ve literally lost track of the number of people in my orbit who have had it- it’s probably nearing 100, honestly. And I’ve had 6 people in my life die from it (thankfully none since vaccines became available).

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u/blind512 Oct 09 '21

I know quite a few people, from my experience--Nearly 10-15. Most whom of which did not make much effort to quarantine. The majority of people I talk to: work, home, friends, family--have been vaccinated. I'd say only 2-3 of the vaccinated were positive for covid (after their vaccine) but recovered fairly quickly.

What's sad is many who are vaccinated and test positive--end up getting it from working a job that involves direct interaction with others (restaurants for example). Probably from someone they were waiting on. These and many others are the ones who are really getting the shit end of the stick: Shut down initially, potentially lose their jobs. And come back to test positive because they need a job to make ends.

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u/Ninjasebranek Oct 09 '21

I know 5 people that got it total

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u/0x126 Oct 09 '21

Knew two dead now, brothers family had it, two aunts. Both grandmothers died but none of covid which is a miracle because Eastern Europe caretakers didn’t give a shit killing their customers by spreading the virus multiple times. Strange times, while my best friend does not get vaxxed because he thinks DNA is altered an we are lab rats - right wing propaganda here to go against democratic government…

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u/mr_pineapples44 Oct 09 '21

I live in regional Western Australia. The last case of Covid we had in my region was last May. The whole state has had just 3 cases of community spread this year - in a population of 2.7 million people. In total, we've had 9 people die. Not 9 per 100k.... just, 9.

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u/rffhorfsughoraerae Oct 09 '21

Im betting either you or Tasmania will be the last people to hold out on Covid 0. Over the ditch from you it's steadily spreading across the north island and there's no real attempt to close off the south (also hasnt had any cases since the initial outbreak last year) so we've pretty much accepted that we'll soon be like vic/nsw

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u/ihave2shoes Oct 09 '21

I still blame the travel bubble. What a stupid fucking idea that was. New Zealand’s healthcare system can not handle a large scale event. If delta takes hold, it’s not going to be good.

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u/SparkyDogPants Oct 09 '21

I worked at a testing clinic in Miles City that was so backed up they used drones to take pictures. We tested 1000+ people that weekend which is 20% of the town. The same thing happened in Glendive (granted, not south east, but still east). This was all over the summer, I want to say in June.

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u/FixForb Oct 09 '21

ayyy did you also have the national guard help out with testing? I work in a small county in MT (too small for me to feel comfortable saying) and one day we had a mass testing event where we tested about 20% of the county!

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u/Fickle-Scene-4773 OC: 5 Oct 09 '21 Silver Gold Wholesome

Data Sources: New York Times and US Census Bureau.
Produced using Python 3.8 in a Jupyter notebook on Anaconda.

Based on feedback from an earlier post using a similar visualization, I updated this with the most recent data, pushed the first date back to Feb 1, 2020, made the data more readable, and adjusted the color scale to make it easier for color blind people to see the differences.

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u/muppetjones Oct 09 '21

Good job and thank you for the color-blind friendly palette.

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u/Kanekesoofango Oct 09 '21

There are no cases if you can't see the color.

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u/shnooqichoons Oct 09 '21 Silver All-Seeing Upvote

Same is true if you don't do testing.

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u/Uriah_Peep Oct 09 '21

So I said SLOW THE TESTING DOWN!

[Audience roars]

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u/UserNamesCantBeTooLo Oct 09 '21

What the fuck happened to this country to let that happen

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u/chevymonza Oct 09 '21

Propaganda that goes unchecked because the decision-makers profit too much.

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u/SprinklesFancy5074 Oct 09 '21

Anti-intellectualism.

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u/PrestigiousAd3900 Oct 09 '21

50 years of Republican fuckery

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u/thegoatwrote Oct 09 '21

That’s the Russian approach, and it works! I heard they’ve been having a terrible pneumonia outbreak, though.

/s

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u/CaptainCallus Oct 09 '21

You should also change the thing on the side to say "per 100 thousand residents" rathe than "per capita," which means per person.

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u/peepay Oct 09 '21

What, you didn't have 80 cases per person?

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u/guywithredditacount Oct 09 '21

Yes. One person caught it 80 times.

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u/halfanothersdozen Oct 09 '21

Good shit.

Really horrifying what happened the last few months and how different the country's reaction to it was.

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u/cousinbalki Oct 09 '21

Vaccination makes difference. We will never shut down like before. Overall, less people are dying, and those who are dying are mostly those who made a bad choice about the vaccine.

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u/ZebZ Oct 09 '21

Overall, less people are dying

More people have died in the first 9 months of 2021 than in the last 9 months of 2020, even with the vaccine being widely available for 5 of those months.

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u/nw-redditor Oct 09 '21

When Trump left office, we’d just passed 400,000 deaths in the US. We’re now just over 700,000.

And yes, the vaccine is available. >99% of the deaths today are among the unvaccinated. They’ve confused the medical decision of taking a vaccine as a political stand against liberals. They’re now the main group dying from a preventable disease.

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u/nearbiological Oct 09 '21

Assuming you're from the US.

More people have died in the US this year than last. That's not surprising because the virus has had enough time to blanket the states as well as mutate into multiple variants.

We need to remain vigilant. The vaccine is vital for creating herd immunity and breaking the transmission chain but we still know very little about this virus and we are still very much in the woods.

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u/ARFiest1 Oct 09 '21

is it open sourced

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u/Taylor_Polynomia1 Oct 09 '21

100 cases per capita?

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u/experts_never_lie Oct 09 '21

"It's a really bad pandemic, with some people getting it 100 times at once."

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u/official_guy123 Oct 09 '21

can you post your code? i’m really interested to see how you did the graphic

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u/uhh_ Oct 09 '21

I'd be interested in deaths instead of new cases.

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u/SeventhSolar Oct 09 '21 edited Oct 09 '21

You would probably need both a total death count current death rate and historical death rate to get a good look at that, Covid causes indirect deaths as well as direct deaths. And cause of death might get fudged a bit here and there.

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u/ba00j Oct 09 '21

I found this to be helpful metric to look at Covid impact comparatively. Compare it to how many people died a day in 2019.

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u/mumblekingLilNutSack Oct 09 '21

Ironically it saved some lives to, i.e. car accidents and influenza. But stress has to be killing people so....idk

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u/DankNerd97 Oct 09 '21

What happened to Missouri about halfway through, where it blipped black briefly and then back?

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u/mr_Tsavs Oct 09 '21

Poor record reporting

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u/PublicFigureX Oct 09 '21

Nebraska should go black for a bit too. The state started blatantly hiding it's covid numbers at one point. Which is why it stays blue while everything else goes red

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u/CarlPeligro Oct 09 '21

Can confirm.

Source: Am Nebraskan, hate my life.

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u/_redcloud Oct 09 '21

Nebraska: Home of Carhenge and dollar store Lex Luther

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u/kayliemarie Oct 09 '21

As a non-native Nebraskan living in Nebraska, I thought hating it here was just part of the culture.

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u/[deleted] Oct 09 '21 edited Oct 09 '21

[deleted]

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u/Conchobair Oct 09 '21

Tell me about your liquor laws.

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u/faux_pseudo OC: 1 Oct 09 '21

State run stores, closed on Sunday. You can now get alcohol at brunch but don't even think about buying beer or wine before noon at a grocery store on Sunday. But distilleries will be able to start selling on Sunday.

Oh, and the stores are so badly managed they are half empty right now and they are replacing the person in charge because if a state run monopoly can't keep stocked then something is wrong.

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u/ATomatoAmI Oct 09 '21

Yeah, not fun, but you get used to it after a few years. It was weird to me when I lived in another state for a few years that you could just roll up to a Liquor Barn.

But hey, maybe the Sunday thing will go away at least if they're relaxing it for distilleries.

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u/slamdamnsplits Oct 09 '21

Any articles on the hiding of the data? Was this an incompetence thing or a malice thing?

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u/whyouiouais Oct 09 '21

"Hiding data" is one way to talk about it. Nebraska stopped their COVID dashboard, brought back a stripped down version, and then after a spike in cases, it's fully back atm. If cases go back down, it'll be shut down again. When a stripped down version was up, there was only like 14 counties allowed to report data because of privacy laws. A lot of public health officials argued with the dashboard and reporting being cut originally because even though things were doing better, our vaccination rate is still poor and could easily go back up (which it did).

To understand why the above happened, you have to understand that Nebraska is very rural outside it's two main cities in the east (which are 45 minutes from each other). This is part of the justification for why the dashboard was originally shut down, even with as little data as possible, because the counties are so small, people would be able to figure out who got COVID and privacy wouldn't be a thing. The governor is term limited and we're going to have an election in 2022. He's always been on the conservative side, but in the last year it's gotten much more performative (ex. Colorado announced a week to encourage people to try plant based diet and the NE governor declared the same week to be a beef eating week).

Article talking about the situation from a local newspaper.

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u/whateversconvenient Oct 09 '21

fuck our little chode of a governor

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u/OpsadaHeroj Oct 09 '21

You two have almost the same exact avatar. I really thought he was replying to himself for a second there

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u/Classified0 OC: 1 Oct 09 '21

Reddit has avatars?

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u/ShapShip Oct 09 '21

Yeah, I forget sometimes because I use redditisfun and the old version of reddit on desktop lol

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u/Classified0 OC: 1 Oct 09 '21

Oh yeah, new reddit. I just use old.reddit.com usually.

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u/StatmanIbrahimovic Oct 09 '21

There's r/TheLastAirbender, r/AvatarMemes and a few others that I shan't be mentioning.

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u/halfanothersdozen Oct 09 '21

Pretty telling also in the days leading up to the blip Missouri looks cold relative to the surrounding states. Underreporting and then dump. This is why people flip out about that kind of thing!

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u/Puddleswims Oct 09 '21

Yeah Tennessee had a day like that too. We went from averaging 1000 cases a day last spring up to 1500 then right back down to 1000 all in a week because of one data dump. You can see the whole state of Tennessee flash orange for a couple days on the map.

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u/thatonebitchL Oct 09 '21

Here's an article about it. We spent our covid monies on tourism.

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u/Seereey Oct 09 '21

Yep, to add onto it It started in Northern Missouri even before it got bad in Springfield, it was mostly attributed to Senior school trips and graduation parties. One trip had most of the students on the bus infected (following 4-6 hour drive and close proximity to each other) https://missouriindependent.com/2021/05/28/covid-surge-in-north-missouri-creates-worries-for-summer-as-vaccinations-decline/

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u/Dextrofunk Oct 09 '21

Around June, I was like, "hey we're doing better than I thought!", Nope.

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u/Gureiify Oct 09 '21

I was actually in East Asia in march 2020, and came home right as quarantine/lockdown went into effect. I can't believe that was 1.8 years ago... feels like another lifetime.

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u/Redrix_ Oct 09 '21

Who measures their years in tenths

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u/NoSlack11B Oct 09 '21

Do you even science?

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u/XephyrX Oct 09 '21

I was in Korea for 2 weeks in November of 2019, right when the pandemic started in Wuhan. The first Chinese cases probably popped up as I was boarding my plane to go back to LA. If I delayed my trip for a few months I could have been stuck there by myself for an extended period of time and not gotten the job I did which fortunately went remote quickly. Guess we chose our timing well.

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u/ShannonGrant Oct 09 '21

I was counting covid cases in Italy in the news from the midsouth while my SO, her mom, and aunt were on vacation in London. They flew back February 29th. Few weeks later, we are locked down like everybody else, now her with 104.5 fever. I had never seen one get that high before.

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u/pruwyben Oct 09 '21

*1.6 years ago

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u/Background_Cheetah75 Oct 09 '21

Wtf happened august of ‘21??

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u/sunrise-land Oct 09 '21

Delta Variant

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u/rossie_valentine Oct 09 '21

Wasn't it the back to school and the boycott on mandatory masks?

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u/Adodie Oct 09 '21 edited Oct 09 '21

I mean, those didn't help.

But Delta is so contagious (and vaccine uptake in many states low enough) that a massive increase was due to happen in any event.

Signed -- somebody who lives in the Northeast in an area that saw extremely significant spread during OG Covid despite closed schools and near universal mask use

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u/DenverHiker Oct 09 '21

Oh boy you guys are in for a treat when everyone goes inside for winter

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u/Adodie Oct 09 '21

Maybe! Humility's definitely needed when trying to predict the future of these things.

But honestly, I'm feeling pretty optimistic. In my area (CT), cases had already been starting to trend up by this point last year; right now, though, they are steadily (if slowly) declining.

Between high vax rates and high levels of natural immunity, there's tons of population immunity built up by this point

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u/mybustersword Oct 09 '21

I work at a smaller clinic in ct and I have been using that as good indicator of overall rates. We see increases in cases coming in before there is a spike. We had been good, but expect to see a spike soon.

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u/JohnnyLeven Oct 09 '21

The Delta Variant spike started well before most schools were in session.

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u/ouishi Oct 09 '21

Yes, but in my area school-based transmission was occurring 4x more frequently than in August of 2020. Schools definitely were a bigger source of transmission compared to pre-Delta waves. This was also exacerbated by the fact that most school-aged kids aren't eligible for vaccination.

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u/DrLongIsland Oct 09 '21

Yes. But also yes.

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u/PiggeryJokery Oct 09 '21

Annual face licking festival

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u/AssignmentNo809 Oct 09 '21

Schools reopening with no requirements from some state government to follow any Covid guidelines.

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u/Enartloc Oct 09 '21

We had mandatory masking inside here in Romania, kids nonstop masked in schools, didn't do shit.

Delta + not enough vaccinated population + average to high mobility from the population which pretends COVID doesn't exist = full hospitals

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u/Adodie Oct 09 '21

Yeah...

The gold standard RCT study for masking found that a 29 percentage point increase in community cloth/surgical mask usage was associated with a 9% decrease in symptomatic seroprevalence.

Now that's a reduction -- and that's great! -- but I feel like lots of folks on Reddit treat masks as invincibility shields that stops COVID in its tracks...when that's not really the case.

That goes doubly when masks typically aren't used in high-transmission environments (restaurants, informal indoor social gatherings, etc.)

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u/Jchlms Oct 09 '21

N95s worn properly do stop covid in its tracks.

Most people do not wear n95s, most people do not wear masks properly. If your mask does not have a proper seal it is effectively just a sneeze guard, lets not mention the fact that people love to wear their masks beneath their nose.

Seal is important, facial hair impedes this seal.

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u/derolle Oct 09 '21

Missouri got annihilated between 3-7-21 and 3-8-21, the entire state was infected overnight. Odd

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u/buckfuck_ Oct 09 '21

There was a backlog of cases that got reported on that day.

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u/Such_Performance229 Oct 09 '21

Remember in the beginning days when people were just saying “give it two weeks…” and we all dreaded what a wave in two weeks would look like?

Surreal to see it showing waves occur over months and now years

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u/ZweitenMal Oct 09 '21

It’s nearly two years now since we heard the first rumblings out of China.

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u/Zakkimatsu Oct 09 '21

It’s nearly two years now since

Covid is the new 9/11 for milestones in time it feels like. So much polarization has happened so quick plus a quarantine...

Somehow everything pre 2019 seems so distant than it actually was

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u/Austaph Oct 09 '21

If you want to catch a brief whiff of 2016 watch some old Vine compilations on YouTube. Nothing but happy people being goofy.

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u/camdoodlebop Oct 09 '21

the summer of 2016… those were the days. i remember staying up all night watching random streamers with 5 viewers playing video games on twitch

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u/JaredLiwet Oct 09 '21

Somehow everything pre 2019 seems so distant than it actually was

For those of us old enough, this is what it felt like after 9/11/2001.

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u/samb0t Oct 09 '21

Except this feels a hell of a lot more impactful

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u/Thr0waway0864213579 OC: 1 Oct 09 '21

Unless you’re in Iraq. In which case the death toll that resulted from 9/11 was a lot worse than Covid.

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u/sonic_tower Oct 09 '21

That's because it is.

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u/non_clever_username Oct 09 '21

For sure. For those of us not anywhere near New York and/or who didn’t know anyone affected, it was horrifying for a few weeks, but things were mostly back to normal in a month or two.

Covid affected everyone.

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u/misterdave75 Oct 09 '21

I mean 9/11 had long lasting consequences too. Several long wars, changes in travel, fear of more attacks (anthrax anyone?). Covid is worse of course, but 9/11 was a major turning point as well.

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u/Lucky_Mongoose Oct 09 '21

The event itself maybe, but the drastic shift in politics can still be seen today.

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u/SaffellBot Oct 09 '21

The wheels of the culture war spin again, lit with new fires of outrage. While the outcome is unknowable, it will certainly mark another distinct before and after phase for us, and will be defining for those unfortunate children born in 2000.

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u/ACardAttack Oct 09 '21

It seems like every decade has some big event to mark it's social start, Covid seems to be it for the 20's

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u/Qiob Oct 09 '21

I remember watching the news with my girl in like january when they were showing the pictures of how many cars were at the hospitals in china compared to the year before. Never in my wildest dreams did I think it would turn into what it has

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u/non_clever_username Oct 09 '21

Yeah my dumb ass went on a work business trip the second week of March. Then shit hit the fan and everything shut down while I was there.

In fairness to people, SARS, bird flu, swine flu and probably others were reported on like they were going to become Covid and they obviously never did.

I think for a lot of people, myself included, we just assumed Covid would fizzle out like those did and that it wasn’t something to really worry about.

I guess that’s a real-world impact of crying wolf one too many times over a decade.

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u/uberfission Oct 09 '21

The problem with "crying wolf" is that precautions were taken to prevent SARS, bird flu, swine flu, etc from becoming pandemics, which is why they never went global. COVID was just allowed to go rampant.

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u/Xx_Gandalf-poop_xX Oct 09 '21

Am a nurse and knew we were in for trouble when the doctors at my work all had a very scared look on while watching videos out of Italy in February 2020 together in the conference room. And being a bit concerned when all the masks, gowns and N95s suddenly disappeared from the clean utility rooms without warning before the first case in my state

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u/ThrowMeAwy1996 Oct 09 '21

I remember looking at a map for just my city and being able to see the increased cases around factories that stayed open, and where a good portion of the work force for the blue collar jobs lived. The more affluent areas on the "good side" of the city had noticeably fewer cases. I assume because of being able to work from home.

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u/VeronaMoreau Oct 09 '21

Very much so. This is actually one of the reasons suggested for racial disparities in infections and deaths too.

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u/cop_pls Oct 09 '21

This is why restaurants and bars can't hire anyone at the old wages. The pandemic killed, disabled, laid off, or scared off huge chunks of the food service industry. Head chef or dishwasher, COVID doesn't care.

Now labor supply is incredibly tight in the market, but these businesses already run on thin margins, and will do anything but raise wages in response.

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u/GeorgeRRZimmerman Oct 09 '21

When you look at the responses from the "business owners" that complain that no one wants to work, there's a hilarious trend of them actually having changed absolutely nothing about the work environment except for the things the governments have mandated (wear masks, that's it. There's no mandates for being cleaner, or even for forcing social distancing).

So I don't feel a damn thing for those types. They've tried nothing and it didn't work. They want to keep trying nothing until it does work.

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u/atomicbibleperson Oct 09 '21

We’ve tried nothing and we’re all out of ideas!

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u/pileodung Oct 09 '21 edited Oct 09 '21

Yeah my boss wanted me back full time to work in the kitchen (I'm typically a server), but he wouldn't give me more than $14/hour so I told him to kick rocks. Thats not enough for me to put my kid in daycare, so I'm gonna stay home and continue working part time.

Also, I disagree on the thin margins. Restaurants make bank because food cost is generally pretty low, labor cost is ~5% at least at my work. And they overcharge for every little thing. The small restaurant I work at made a million dollars last year. They didn't need government bailouts, but received them.

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u/sheenhowell Oct 09 '21

Holy shit I struggle so hard every day to keep my labor cost below 25%. Even a super busy day like today with a 8 person staff we made like around $3.5k and I still ended up with like 20% labor cost. Maybe our prices are to low, but for the average income of my district of our city (central coast california) were basically the most high quality and highest cost pizza place around. Most of our employees are being paid 13/hrs as minimum wage for private business under 26 employees

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u/d0nu7 Oct 09 '21

Idk what restaurant that guy worked at but when I worked fast food Sonic wanted under 8% labor cost.

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u/RadioMelon Oct 09 '21

Watching it get intensely red and dangerous again was very upsetting.

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u/dukec Oct 09 '21

Yeah, that brief reprieve this summer was cruel for getting our hopes up.

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u/lunardaddy69 Oct 09 '21

Yeah I felt that in my bones

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u/australopithy Oct 09 '21

Me too. Partner is a hospitalist and the burn out is very, very real.

I hope everyone in your house is recovering, however your comment was meant!

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u/B3000C Oct 09 '21

That's great work, OP! Thank you for making this.

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u/camdoodlebop Oct 09 '21

you can tell where nebraska thought it could hide its cases completely until they got so overloaded that they couldn’t hide it anymore and it all flooded out like a burst dam

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u/hisuisan Oct 09 '21

Why did the northern Midwest get hit so hard early on?

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u/404_UserNotFound Oct 09 '21

Strugis the month before...

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u/[deleted] Oct 09 '21

[deleted]

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u/erratic_bonsai Oct 09 '21

Minnesota did cancel the State Fair, actually. There’s a reason the southern half of the state turned much later than the rest of the region despite being the most populated place in the region. The political demographics of the area are essentially redredredredTwinCitiesBLUEredredred and unfortunately, following medical advice seems to be a partisan issue these days.

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u/rognabologna Oct 09 '21

There was a good while where we were surrounded on all sides—Dakotas, Wisconsin, Iowa, and northern MN—and there was an impending sense of doom. Interesting to see that on the map.

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u/alienatedframe Oct 09 '21

The governors of the Dakotas kinda made anti covid measures their thing. But a virus doesn’t care about your ideology.

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u/hisuisan Oct 09 '21

Aren't the Dakota's much more scarcely and less densely populated than say, New York and the like?

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u/alienatedframe Oct 09 '21

Yes they are. By a ton.

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u/hippymule Oct 09 '21

Me: Oh it really improved, and looks like it peaked...oh fuck...never mind

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u/RealButtMash Oct 09 '21

Nobodys gonna mention Michigan in April 2021?

And poor alaska during the delta variant...

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u/Pawgilicious Oct 09 '21

You mean now? Yay, Alaska! Help!

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u/AdaGang Oct 09 '21

We had pretty stringent lockdown measures here that got lifted when republican state congresspeople stripped the governor of her emergency powers to declare mandates. It is my theory that these measures were fairly effective, but once lifted, we had a huge population of people with no immunity that allowed the presence of Covid to just explode like a ticking time bomb. In other states, Covid was allowed to spread sooner, and so they had more initial infections when the pandemic was in its infancy and thus had a larger proportion of the population with an adaptive immune response to the virus. In Michigan, Covid spread throughout like seeds in a field that sprang to life when conditions became favorable all at once.

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u/RealButtMash Oct 09 '21

But only in michigan specifically though? It seemed to stay within borders?

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u/Hypocee Oct 09 '21

I mean, yeah. Governor Whitmer moved pretty aggressively, for a politician, and did as much as she could under her executive powers. My impression has been that policies here came sooner and were more stringent than in our neighboring states.

Remember how those MAGAts got arrested in a plot to capture and murder her? Granted it's mostly because she's a woman and a Democrat, but I think the factor that pushed them from general reactionary fantasy bloodlust to holding meetings and kitting weapons toward a specific goal was that she was a woman Democrat who did something.

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u/HotWine Oct 09 '21 Hugz

"Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in!"

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u/Boiled-Artichoke Oct 09 '21

I’d like to see this with deaths, at least this second wave won’t seem as bad.

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u/Fickle-Scene-4773 OC: 5 Oct 09 '21

Watch this space. I'll create one for deaths in the next few days.

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u/alienatedframe Oct 09 '21

So weird to think about how abstract is seemed in late February, and how odd everything was a year ago. Very grateful for vaccines. We’ve dealt with some truly odd times.

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u/busterlungs Oct 09 '21

I was stressing the fuck out in November of 19 seeing what was going on in China at that time and nobody was saying shit about it. I was already so worried about it by the beginning of 20 I thought the world was gonna end for a bit there in april

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u/kRkthOr Oct 09 '21

Not in the US and we got hit way earlier but I had a similar experience. I was seeing it happening and everyone was like "nah it won't get here lol you're overreacting" but I went and stocked up about 2 weeks worth of food and water for my family (luckily my wife was on my side.) When it hit this small island supermarkets were rushed and emptied, supply chains couldn't keep up. It was nice having a buffer until things settled down (only took a week or so really but it was bad those first few days) and also not having to fight for food in enclosed spaces knowing what we know now.

I've never been so grateful for youtube preppers.

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u/Boiled-Artichoke Oct 09 '21

I found out about in December on accident trying to figure out why a large order from china was delayed so much. By the time mid-March rolled around I had finally convinced myself it wasn’t gonna be a big deal, why else would everyone else be going business as usual? And then, bam.

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u/dojo-dingo Oct 09 '21

I did the same. Saw whispers of it in Jan/feb. it just kept getting worse and worse and I just knew shot was going to hit the fan. We started stocking up when we went to the store... we’d buy an extra bag of rice instead of just one etc. I distinctly remember my husband saying I was overreacting and that we didn’t need to stock up lol. I stocked us up anyway so we were basically a month ahead, and thankfully there was a really good sale on toilet paper back near Christmas so I bought like 5 Costco size packages back then.

Once March rolled around, my work went fully remote by the 13th. Stores starting being hit hard. I remember going grocery shopping at one point and finding TWO of the twenty or so things on our list. Meat was 99% out of stock, no toilet paper at all, shelf-stable staples were just gone everywhere. As nice as it was to be prepared and to know I wasn’t overreacting... I wish I was overreacting.

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u/ziltiod94 Oct 09 '21

Where were you seeing early info about covid in November 2019? That's really early.

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u/frosty4019 Oct 09 '21

What i gathered from this is that it is still clearly far from over. It upsets me still that everyone around me is acting like nothing is happening.

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u/stycks32 Oct 09 '21

That moment at 40 seconds when my whole state was almost black. Can anyone (preferable who has seen the data) explain how MO was so vastly different that surrounding areas without causing another wave? Was it a reporting error in the new cases or something?

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u/FrozenPhoton Oct 09 '21

I’m pretty sure that for a brief period ~Mar2021 MO stopped reporting at the county level and only statewide (therefore making this visualization impossible). I tried a quick google search to find evidence but googling “covid” is really difficult to tease out older articles from recent ones

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u/GalaxyAwesome Oct 09 '21

IIRC they changed the counting method to include “presumed” positive cases. This applied retroactively, so they added the past cases to the count all at once.

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u/Recent_Peach_2247 Oct 09 '21

It's one person coming in from China and will be gone by Easter.

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u/MyBumIsClammy Oct 09 '21

Reading and remembering that made me so mad

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u/FlaxPicker Oct 09 '21

Man, how have i not gotten covid yet.

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u/aweb93 Oct 09 '21

I lived in SW Missouri while I was at school (Go Bears!), and I am not surprised. Gotta be one of the most braindead parts of the country.

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u/Itrampleupontheeye Oct 09 '21

Every time I see one of these I go "Look at how much better it got... aannnnd then they relaxed mandates right as Delta hit..."

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u/SurpriseTimely Oct 09 '21 edited Oct 09 '21

Cool piece well done op! Maybe make the map a bit bigger (less white space) as it’s hard to tell what’s up unless it’s a big space

Edit *I mean except for the big waves, individual sections are too small to see really for the smaller county spiked

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u/call_shawn Oct 09 '21

Love living in northern New England

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