r/PublicFreakout Oct 13 '21 Silver 9 Gold 1 LOVE! 1 Helpful 8 Wholesome 8 Hugz 11 Starstruck 1 Crab Rave 1 To The Stars 1

Yeah, you're a fool! 👮Audit Freakout

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u/Deleena24 Oct 13 '21

Apologizing on film means they're openly admitting to violating policies, which forces the hand of their superiors. They're trained to never admit any type of fault, even if it's blatantly obvious.

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u/big617isaac Oct 13 '21

this is actually 100% true and not just for police, my parents and driving school teacher both told me if I ever got in an accident to never say sorry or admit fault for insurance reasons. similarly at my grocery store that i work at i was told by coworkers never to apologize or admit fault to customers. apologizing is meaningless in the professional adult world apparently

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u/antwan_benjamin Oct 14 '21

I read somewhere that they had to make it a law in Canada that saying "I'm sorry" doesn't necessarily mean admitting guilt since they're so used to apologizing all the time.

I think the US should do the same. If I get in a car accident...even if its not my fault I still might say "I'm sorry." I'm not saying "I'm sorry I did this to you" I'm saying "I'm sorry this happened." 2 completely different meanings.

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u/JamesGray Oct 14 '21

36 US states actually have some sort of "Apology Law" that makes it not evidence of guilt to apologize as long as you don't directly admit guilt in your apology.

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u/antwan_benjamin Oct 14 '21

Is that criminal or civil?

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u/JamesGray Oct 14 '21

I'm not quite sure, someone just told me off for mentioning the Canadian law thing one time, and I confirmed by looking it up. Looks like it's definitely for civil issues from the fact it apparently originated from medical malpractice suits.

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u/antwan_benjamin Oct 14 '21

Makes sense. Thanks for looking it up.